Skip header navigation
×

Commentary

Root-associated fungi and carbon storage in Arctic ecosystems

Citation
Robinson CH, Wookey PA & Parker TC (2020) Root-associated fungi and carbon storage in Arctic ecosystems. New Phytologist, 226 (1), pp. 8-10. https://doi.org/10.1111/nph.16443

Abstract
Permafrost soils contain c. 1980 Pg carbon (C; Schuur et al., 2015), more than twice the size of the atmospheric C pool. Thawing permafrost, subsequent changes in hydrological conditions and resulting microbial decomposition of previously frozen organic C is one of the most significant potential feedbacks from terrestrial ecosystems to the atmosphere in a changing climate (Schuur et al., 2008; Hugelius et al., 2012; Hope & Schaefer, 2016): such changes are now occurring at a dramatic pace over large regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

Keywords
active layer; Arctic ecosystems; dark septate endophytes; ectomycorrhizal fungi; ericoid mycorrhizal fungi; permafrost; tundra

Journal
New Phytologist: Volume 226, Issue 1

StatusPublished
Author(s)Robinson, Clare H; Wookey, Philip A; Parker, Thomas C
FundersNatural Environment Research Council
Publication date30/04/2020
Publication date online28/02/2020
Date accepted by journal17/01/2020
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/30852
PublisherWiley
ISSN0028-646X
eISSN1469-8137
Scroll back to the top