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Article

Revisiting Photovoice: Perceptions of Dementia among Researchers with Intellectual Disability

Citation
Watchman K, Mattheys K, Doyle A, Boustead L & Rincones O (2020) Revisiting Photovoice: Perceptions of Dementia among Researchers with Intellectual Disability. Qualitative Health Research, 30 (7), pp. 1019-1032. https://doi.org/10.1177/1049732319901127

Abstract
There is limited evidence internationally exploring perceptions of dementia among people with intellectual disabilities. This article presents findings from the first known study where an inclusive research team, including members with intellectual disability, used photovoice methodology to visually represent views of people with intellectual disabilities and dementia. Drawing on Freire’s empowerment pedagogy, study aims were consistent with global photovoice aims: enabling people to visually record critical dialogue about dementia through photography and social change. We investigated the benefits and challenges of photovoice methodology with this population and sought to identify perspectives of dementia from people with intellectual disabilities. Findings challenge the notion that a key photovoice aim of reaching policymakers is always achievable, suggesting that revisiting Freire’s original methodological aims may lead to improved outcomes in co-produced research with marginalized groups. Qualitative themes emerged identifying issues such as peers ‘disappearing’ and the importance of maintaining friendship as dementia progressed.

Keywords
learning disability; disability; disabled persons; dementia; minorities; cultural competence; qualitative; Scotland; photovoice; participatory action research

Journal
Qualitative Health Research: Volume 30, Issue 7

StatusPublished
Author(s)Watchman, Karen; Mattheys, Kate; Doyle, Andrew; Boustead, Louise; Rincones, Orlando
FundersAlzheimer's Society
Publication date30/06/2020
Publication date online13/02/2020
Date accepted by journal30/12/2019
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/30622
ISSN1049-7323
eISSN1552-7557

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