Article

Why have generational orderings been marginalised in the social sciences including childhood studies?

Citation

Punch S (2020) Why have generational orderings been marginalised in the social sciences including childhood studies?. Childrens Geographies, 18 (2), pp. 128-140. https://doi.org/10.1080/14733285.2019.1630716

Abstract
This paper considers why age and generation tend not to be recognised as social variables in the same way that gender, ethnicity and class are mainstreamed within Social Science disciplines. It questions why the concept of the generational order is not always integral to either Childhood Studies or the related sub-disciplines, such as Children’s Geographies. It begins from a starting point that Childhood Studies is generally a multi-disciplinary field but seems stuck from moving forward conceptually. The politics of Childhood Studies can result in sub-disciplinary silos rather than working in a more interdisciplinary way. The politics of childhood in society have progressed in terms of children’s rights and participation yet the theoretical development of children’s agency has been stuck. The paper discusses the lack of extensive empirical investigation of the generational order, suggesting that ‘generational orderings’ may be a more dynamic way to engage with processes of generationing.

Keywords
Childhood; child–adult relations; childhood studies; intergenerationality; generational order; children’s agency

Journal
Childrens Geographies: Volume 18, Issue 2

StatusPublished
Publication date31/12/2020
Publication date online17/06/2019
Date accepted by journal23/05/2019
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/29845
ISSN1473-3285