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Article

Health and health behaviours among a cohort of first year nursing students in Scotland: A self-report survey

Citation
Evans JMM, Eades CE & Cameron DM (2019) Health and health behaviours among a cohort of first year nursing students in Scotland: A self-report survey. Nurse Education in Practice, 36, pp. 71-75. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nepr.2019.02.019

Abstract
The study aim was to collect data on the health and health-related behaviours of undergraduate nursing students at a Higher Education Institution in Scotland, to identify the need for potential health behaviour change interventions as part of their undergraduate course. An anonymous self-report questionnaire (with questions about physical activity, diet, sleep, alcohol, smoking, mental health) was administered to first year nursing students at a Scottish university. The response rate was 88%, with 207 respondents (26 male, 178 female, 3 other). Age ranged from 16 to 45 years (mean 24.5 years). Overall, 48 (23.1%) students rated their physical health as excellent/very good, and 100 (48.3%) their mental health as such. 157 (76.2%) students were achieving 150 min of physical activity per week. There were 48 (29%) and 30 (18.2%) overweight and obese students respectively. 129 (62.6%) students viewed a mobile device for > 30 min before sleep. 176 (86.3%) students consumed alcohol, with 32 (15.4%) reporting binge drinking. The prevalence of current smoking was 24.8%. The students’ health behaviour profile was therefore broadly similar to that of the general population in Scotland, but smoking, diet, sleep practices and binge-drinking were identified as priority areas for health education and intervention.

Keywords
Nursing; Education; Health behaviour; Behaviour change

Journal
Nurse Education in Practice: Volume 36

StatusPublished
Author(s) Evans, Josie M M; Eades, Claire E; Cameron, Dawn M
Publication date31/03/2019
Publication date online12/03/2019
Date accepted by journal27/02/2019
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/29040
ISSN1471-5953
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