Commentary

Commentary: Fairness is intuitive

Citation

Myrseth KOR & Wollbrant C (2016) Commentary: Fairness is intuitive. Commentary on: Cappelen, A. W., Nielsen, U. H., Tungodden, B., Tyran, J.-R., and Wengström, E. (2015). Fairness is intuitive, Exp. Econ. doi: 10.1007/s10683-015-9463-y. [Epub ahead of print].. Frontiers in Psychology, 1 (7), Art. No.: 654. https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2016.00654

Abstract
First paragraph: Cappelen et al. (2015) open their paper, “Fairness is intuitive,” with the observation, “A key question in the social sciences is whether it is intuitive to behave in a fair manner or whether fair behavior requires active self-control” (p. 2). They purport to offer “evidence showing that fair behavior is intuitive to most people” (p. 1). Their premise is that deciding by intuition is faster than deciding by deliberation. While this premise in and on itself is rather uncontroversial—the conclusion that they draw from it is not: “Since a decision that relies on intuition is typically made faster than a decision that relies on deliberation, the response time of a fair decision relative to a selfish decision provides an important indication of the intuitiveness of fair behavior” (p. 2). This reasoning, in fact, amounts to a reverse inference fallacy. “Intuitive” may mean “fast,” but this would not imply that “fast” means “intuitive.”

Keywords
fairness; self-control; intuition; decision times; dictator game

Journal
Frontiers in Psychology: Volume 1, Issue 7

StatusPublished
FundersSwedish Research Council
Publication date31/05/2016
Publication date online31/05/2016
Date accepted by journal19/04/2016
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/28913
Item discussed Cappelen, A. W., Nielsen, U. H., Tungodden, B., Tyran, J.-R., and Wengström, E. (2015). Fairness is intuitive, Exp. Econ. doi: 10.1007/s10683-015-9463-y. [Epub ahead of print].