Article

Participation with alcohol marketing and user-created promotion on social media, and the association with higher-risk alcohol consumption and brand identification among adolescents in the UK

Alternative title Social media, higher-risk consumption, and brand identification

Details

Citation

Critchlow N, MacKintosh AM, Thomas C, Hooper L & Vohra J (2019) Participation with alcohol marketing and user-created promotion on social media, and the association with higher-risk alcohol consumption and brand identification among adolescents in the UK [Social media, higher-risk consumption, and brand identification]. Addiction Research and Theory, 27 (6), pp. 515-526. https://doi.org/10.1080/16066359.2019.1567715

Abstract
Aim: To explore participation with alcohol marketing (i.e. commenting on brand statuses) and user-created promotion on social media (i.e. photos of peers drinking) by young people in the United Kingdom (UK), and what association this has with higher-risk consumption and brand identification. Method: Online cross-sectional survey with 11–19-year olds in the UK (n = 3,399) (average age: 15 years old). Past-month participation was measured for five forms of alcohol marketing on social media and one form of user-created promotion (all Yes/No). Past-month awareness of nine wider alcohol marketing activities, social media apps used at least weekly, and ownership of branded merchandise were included as covariates. Outcomes included higher-risk consumption in current drinkers (≥5 AUDIT-C) and brand identification in all respondents (8 pictures with brand names removed). Results: Over one-in-ten respondents (13.2%) had participated with at least one form of marketing on social media or participated with user-created promotion (12.2%). For both, participation was greater in current drinkers and those of legal purchasing age. A logistic regression found that participation with two or more forms of marketing on social media (AOR = 1.96, p < .01) and participation with user-created promotion (AOR = 3.46, p < .001) were associated with higher-risk drinking. Respondents, on average, identified 2.58 (SD = 2.12) alcohol brands. A linear regression found participation with marketing on social media was not associated with brand identification (β = 0.01, p =.42) but participation with user-created promotion was (β = 0.05, p < .001). Conclusion: Social media provides opportunities for adolescents to participate with commercial marketing and user-created promotion and this is associated with higher-risk consumption and brand identification.

Keywords
Alcohol marketing; social media; brand identification; young people; alcohol consumption

Journal
Addiction Research and Theory: Volume 27, Issue 6

StatusPublished
FundersCancer Research UK
Publication date31/12/2019
Publication date online19/02/2019
Date accepted by journal03/12/2018
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/28758
ISSN1606-6359
eISSN1476-7392

People (2)

People

Dr Nathan Critchlow
Dr Nathan Critchlow

Research Fellow, Institute for Social Marketing

Ms Anne Marie MacKintosh
Ms Anne Marie MacKintosh

Senior Researcher, Institute for Social Marketing

Projects (1)

Analysis of Youth Alcohol Policy Survey
PI: