Article

Improving uptake of seasonal influenza vaccination by healthcare workers: Implementation differences between higher and lower uptake NHS trusts in England

Citation

Stead M, Critchlow N, Patel R, MacKintosh AM & Sullivan F (2019) Improving uptake of seasonal influenza vaccination by healthcare workers: Implementation differences between higher and lower uptake NHS trusts in England. Infection, Disease and Health, 24 (1), pp. 3-12. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.idh.2018.09.082

Abstract
Background Uptake of influenza vaccination by healthcare workers (HCWs) may be related to how influenza campaigns are implemented. This study explores differences in annual influenza campaign implementation between NHS trusts (healthcare organisations) with higher and lower vaccine uptake. Methods A cross-sectional survey with influenza campaign staff in 2016/2017 in 87 NHS trusts in England. The survey measured vaccination policy and uptake target, staff involvement, accessibility, use of peer vaccinators, communication strategies, strategies to address HCW concerns, use of incentives, and management support. The analysis considered implementation differences between higher (n Z 50) and lower (n Z 37) uptake trusts. Results and Conclusions Higher uptake trusts were more likely to set higher uptake targets, involve a broader range of staff groups in the campaign, and make the vaccine easy to access by core or hard-toreach HCWs. Higher uptake trusts were also more likely to use a greater range of communication strategies, provide real-time feedback on uptake, provide a greater range of incentives to be vaccinated, and have vaccine uptake considered important by managers. Successful influenza vaccination programmes are multifaceted and involve implementation factors at a strategic, organisational, logistical, and personnel level. Lower uptake trusts could improve uptake by identifying and implementing examples of best practice from higher uptake trusts.

Keywords
Influenza; Implementation; National health service; Flu; Vaccination

Journal
Infection, Disease and Health: Volume 24, Issue 1

StatusPublished
FundersPublic Health Research Programme
Publication date28/02/2019
Publication date online31/10/2018
Date accepted by journal05/09/2018
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/28007
PublisherElsevier BV
ISSN2468-0451