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Article

Quantifying stakeholder understanding of an ecosystem service trade-off

Citation
Stosch KC, Quilliam RS, Bunnefeld N & Oliver DM (2019) Quantifying stakeholder understanding of an ecosystem service trade-off. Science of The Total Environment, 651 (Part 2), pp. 2524-2534. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2018.10.090

Abstract
Sustainable management of global natural resources is challenged by social and environmental drivers, adding pressure to ecosystem service provision in many regions of the world where there are competing demands on environmental resources. Understanding trade-offs between ecosystem services and how they are valued by different stakeholder groups is therefore critical to maximise benefits and avoid conflict between competing uses. In this study we developed a novel participatory trade-off experiment to elicit the perception of 43 participants, from across four key stakeholder groups, working in land and water management (Environmental Regulators, Farming Advisors, Water Industry Staff and Catchment Scientists). Using the Production Possibility Frontier (PPF) concept, we quantified stakeholder assessment of both the shape and the uncertainty around the PPF in a trade-off between agricultural intensity and the ecological health of freshwater systems. The majority of stakeholder groups selected threshold and logistic decay trade-off curves to describe the relationship of the trade-off, and estimated the uncertainty around the curves to be intermediate or large. The views of the four stakeholder groups differed significantly regarding how they estimated stakeholder trade-off prioritisation; the largest difference in perspectives was identified between Environmental Regulators and Farm Advisors. The methodology considered the cultural, socio-economic and institutional specificities of an ecosystem service interaction and identified potential sources of conflict but also possible solutions for win-win opportunities to explore and share understanding between stakeholders. Valuing stakeholder knowledge as a form of expert data and integrating this into participatory decision-making processes for land and water management thus contributes considerable value beyond traditional approaches to ecosystem service assessments.

Keywords
Integrated catchment management; Land and water management; Land-use conflict; Participatory techniques; Production possibility frontier; Trade-off analysis;

Journal
Science of The Total Environment: Volume 651, Issue Part 2

StatusPublished
Author(s)Stosch, Kathleen C; Quilliam, Richard S; Bunnefeld, Nils; Oliver, David M
FundersScottish Government
Publication date15/02/2019
Publication date online09/10/2018
Date accepted by journal07/10/2018
URLhttp://hdl.handle.net/1893/28005
PublisherElsevier BV
ISSN0048-9697
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