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Promoting self-management and developing resilience to protect and promote nurses’ physical and mental health and wellbeing

Key Facts

Fee status

England, Northern Ireland, Wales, European Union, International, Scotland

Level

Postgraduate (research)

Deadline

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A study that aims to identify a self-management intervention that can support resilience as a mechanism of action for improving nurse’s health and wellbeing.

Background information

Nurses make up the largest part of the NHS Scotland workforce (43%) and nearly 50% of the global health workforce. Yet, nurses suffer more than average from health problems due to the physical and mental stress of their jobs. Evidence suggests that 61% of nurses reported have very good health, considerably below the 74% in the general population; 42% of nurses had a physical or mental health condition; and, 42% of nurses experience stress and burnout. Within Scotland, research has found nurses have poor diet and are overweight or obese with little physical activity.

Sickness absence rates show that nurses have one of the highest levels across the NHS. Globally and within Scotland nursing vacancies have also been increasing year on year and recruiting nursing staff is increasingly challenging. The Nursing 2030 vision within Scotland states that we must “put in place measures to protect and promote nurses’ physical and mental health and wellbeing finding ways to help nurses stay healthier and fitter for longer so that they are enabled to have long, successful and high satisfying careers meeting the needs of the people of Scotland”. Globally, there is a focus on improving then nursing workforce. Overall, there is a picture of poor health and wellbeing in nursing staff which is affecting the individuals concerned and the organisations and is an area of concern for policy makers. Resilience is a mechanism through which health and wellbeing can be improved.

Therefore we are proposing a study that aims to identify a self-management intervention that can support resilience as a mechanism of action for improving nurse’s health and wellbeing.

Project Aim: To undertake a feasibility study to develop a self-management intervention for nurses that can be delivered in the NHS to improve the health and wellbeing of nurses through building resilience within the workforce.

Proposed Methods: Three study sites (cases) will be included and the study will focus on an analysis of each of the organisations. This will allow for variation in different types of NHS sites and within different socioeconomic areas. The cases will provide an in-depth, detailed study of each of the selected sites thus supporting an investigation of the organisational culture within each of the sites in relation to the experiences and perceptions of resilience and health and wellbeing of the nursing workforce.

The supervisors of the project are Dr Louise Hoyle and Dr Carol Bugge.

Candidates are welcome to make informal enquiries about the project to Dr Louise Hoyle on louise.hoyle@stir.ac.uk.

The project is self-funded, however the opportunity may occasionally arise for paid tasks relating to teaching and research within the Faculty. Further information relating to fees and funding can be found on our postgraduate tuition fees page.

Eligibility and availability

The successful candidate should have:

  • a 1st or 2: 1 degree in a health sciences (nursing, health psychology) or social sciences
  • a Masters degree in a relevant topic area (e.g. health sciences, public health, social sciences) including research methods modules as part of the course.
  • where applicable, an overall IELTS of 6.5, with a minimum of 6.0 in each element

How do I apply?

Applicants are asked to send in all the documentation listed below, attached as a single email, to fhss.pg.cpd.team@stir.ac.uk using the subject header ‘Promoting self-management and developing resilience to protect and promote nurses’ physical and mental health and wellbeing Application’.

Documents to attach include:

  • Academic Transcript(s) and Degree Certificate(s): Final degree transcripts including grades and degree certificates (and official translations, if needed) - scanned copy in colour of the original documents.
  • References: Two references on headed paper (academic and/or professional). At least one reference must be academic. The other can be academic or professional. Your references should be on official headed paper. These should also be signed by the referee. If your referees would prefer to provide confidential references direct to the University then we can also accept the reference by email, from the referee’s official university or business email account to pg.cpd.team@stir.ac.uk clearly labelling the reference e.g. ‘Breast Screening Adherence Reference’
  • Copy of CV: detailing relevant education and work experience.

Applicant Statement: a brief 1-page letter of motivation, outlining your research interests and your thoughts on how you could contribute to our research agenda.

 

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