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Article in Journal ()

Co-observing the weather, co-predicting the climate: Human factors in building infrastructures for crowdsourced data

Citation
Lin YW, Bates J & Goodale P (2016) Co-observing the weather, co-predicting the climate: Human factors in building infrastructures for crowdsourced data, Science and Technology Studies, 29 (3), pp. 10-27.

Abstract
This paper investigates the embodied performance of 'doing citizen science'. It examines how 'citizen scientists' produce scientifi c data using the resources available to them, and how their socio-Technical practices and emotions impact the construction of a crowdsourced data infrastructure. We found that conducting citizen science is highly emotional and experiential, but these individual experiences and feelings tend to get lost or become invisible when user-contributed data are aggregated and integrated into a big data infrastructure. While new meanings can be extracted from big data sets, the loss of individual emotional and practical elements denotes the loss of data provenance and the marginalisation of individual eff orts, motivations, and local politics, which might lead to disengaged participants, and unsustainable communities of citizen scientists. The challenges of constructing a data infrastructure for crowdsourced data therefore lie in the management of both technical and social issues which are local as well as global.

Keywords
Citizen Science; Crowdsourcing; Old Weather; Zooniverse; Big data infrastructure;

StatusPublished
AuthorsLin Y W, Bates Jo, Goodale Paula
Publication date2016
Date accepted by journal20/07/2016
URLhttps://sciencetechnologystudies.journal.fi/…ticle/view/59199
PublisherFinnish Society for STS
ISSN No ISSN
LanguageEnglish

Journal
Science and Technology Studies: Volume 29, Issue 3 (2016)

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