Lochelbank Wind Farm Report

In this project we were commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd (acting for the developer) to investigate the history and authenticity of place-names associated with the Lochelbank site in advance of a public enquiry. The windfarm was approved in August 2007 and archaeological mitigation work was subsequently undertaken.

Historic Grasslands Report

This report was commissioned by Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH) as part of a wider survey of British Grasslands. The aim of the project was to describe the typical grassland management regimes, focussing on the period from the eighteenth century and the agricultural revolution to World War II. Current knowledge of appropriate management for unimproved grasslands is based on our assumptions of the types of low-intensity management in the past that created and maintained species-rich pastures and meadows. We were tasked with looking particularly at grazing seasons, stock types, hay production, cutting dates, fertilisation and manuring, seeding, and long-term consistency of management versus rotation.

A secondary aim of the project was to assess the sources of information available and the degree to which this project was been able to investigate them within the time available. The results of this project have contributed to SNH’s knowledge of appropriate management for unimproved grasslands and to getting designated grasslands into favourable condition. The results of this project have also contributed to a three-year study of the agricultural History of British grasslands planned by Natural England. This will be a UK-wide project, focussing on oral accounts of twentieth century practice and nineteenth century agricultural literature.

History Tomorrow's report can be found on the SNH website and is downloadable for free.

Balgownie Woods Report

In 2007 Forestry Commission Scotland commissioned an archaeological survey of two forested areas to the west of Dunfermline, Fife.  Balgownie Wood (NS 9880 8845) and Dean Plantation (NT 0540 8800) are woodlands that were bought in the 1960s by the Forestry Commission.  Since then, both forests have been subject to partial re-planting but some of the older, original woodlands still remain and within these areas some features of potential cultural heritage significance have been noted by forestry staff. To accompany this archaeological survey History Tomorrow was commissioned to search for historical documentation relating to the two sites.

Prestongrange II

This second Prestongrange report was commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd following recommendations made in the initial Prestongrange and Morison’s Haven report, prepared by Professor Richard Oram in 2004. This first report was a broadly comprehensive evaluation of the surviving records relating to the barony of Prestongrange and it recommended that further specialist work should be undertaken in relation to the surviving sixteenth century series of tacks and writs issued by the Kers acting first as commendators of Newbattle Abbey and later as the earls of Lothian. this second phase of work uncovered an inventory of deeds belonging to Alexander II Morison, who inherited the barony of Prestongrange from his father in 1631. This book can be dated to between 11 July 1622, when Alexander I Morison purchased the barony of Prestongrange from Robert Ker, and 1648. This inventory proved very useful in unravelling the history of the site.

The tumble in the foreground of the photograph is all that remains of one of the piers that once enclosed the harbour at Prestongrange.

Report on teaching Environmental History

Photograph: Rig on land that once belonged to Melrose Abbey.

In Britain, Environmental History is a dynamic new and emerging sub-discipline that demands close inter-disciplinary cooperation and understanding. It is popular at all levels, but undergraduate students intent on studying the subject are faced with an immediate dilemma because Environmental History utilises data from both History and the Sciences. As a consequence, students are required to step outside their individual disciplinary 'comfort zones' and engage with, and use, evidence from an area of study that is usually alien to them. In order to enjoy the full benefits of this interdisciplinary subject, students should be prepared to be both patient when they are on familiar territory and open-minded and diligent when they are not. This report, commissioned by the Higher Education Academy, guides students through some of these unfamiliar territories.

Dunbar Harbour Town House

CFA Archaeology Ltd commissioned History Tomorrow to undertake research into the history of this building as part of a Historic Building Appraisal. The Town House is one of the most important buildings in Dunbar and is of late sixteenth century date. The building was formerly the town gaol and council chambers, and is currently used as the town museum and council offices. It is a Grade A listed structure.

Aberlady report

This report, commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd, was intended to sample the primary manuscript sources relating to Haddington and Aberlady to determine the depth of the surviving records and hopefully uncover some interesting material relating to the harbour of Aberlady, the common way between Haddington and Aberlady (sometimes called the Sea Wynd), the glebe field of Aberlady, and the so-called smuggler's cave to the west of the village on Aberlady Links (now Kilspindie golf course).

Spott's Girnell, Dunbar

This report was commissioned by Addyman Archaeology to allow History Tomorrow to undertake an assessment of the historical records relating to Spott's Girnell (McArthur's Stores). The successful restoration of the building has now been undertaken by Dunbar Harbour Trust to create eleven fishermen’s stores, an office for the Trust, and a meeting room that can be used by harbour users and the wider community. The overall cost of the restoration project was £1.2 million. The Project was undertaken as part of the Dunbar Townscape Heritage Initiative.

Linlithgow Tanneries Report

This report was commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd and it undertook a general survey of the Linlithgow Burgh records to determine if there was any historical evidence relating to the tenements and associated industrial sites between 212 and 224 High Street. Tanners operated from these sites from an early date and it is known that there was also a bakery in the same area.

Report for Tullibody Museum

For this report we were asked to work with Tullibody Museum to produce a history of the town of Tullibody that might be utilised by the museum on their website. 

Kirk Park, Inveresk

This report was commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd and researched the Kirkpark area of Musselburgh, in close proximity to St Michael’s church, which is a well-known area of archaeological interest given its proximity to a Roman fort. The research specifically looked for evidence relating to farming and market gardening on the site, particularly in relation to the Lowe family, who in their heyday were the largest commercial growers in Scotland. They owned a site at Kirkpark and this formed a significant part of their business interests in Lothian.

Edinburgh Castle military monuments

There are seven monuments positioned on the northern edge of the esplanade of Edinburgh Castle. Running in a line west to east the monuments are: the Afghan Needle; the remains of Ensign Stewart; a statue of Frederick Duke of York and Albany; the Scottish Horse Memorial; a monument to Colonel Mackenzie; a statue of Earl Haig, and the India Cross. Chronologically, starting with the earliest monument and ending with the latest, the order is: Duke of York 1839; The India Cross 1861; Colonel Mackenzie 1875; Afghan Needle 1882/3; Scottish Horse 1905; Earl Haig 1923, Ensign Ewart 1938. History Tomorrow was commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd to investigate the history of these statues and try to determine who owned them. This was in advance of work on the Castle Esplanade amid fears of damage to the statues. The Earl Haig statue has subsequently been moved into the castle and to a safer location.

Pinkie Battlefield Report I

A number of concerns have been expressed about the threat of building development in the vicinity of the site of the battle of Pinkie (1547) near Musselburgh. The general battlefield location lies within an extensive area of improved agricultural countryside and no effort has been made to discover how these improvements will have altered both the local landscape and battle site over time. This period of improvement, which can be generally classified as occurring during the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, would typically have included the improvement and deepening of soils, the erection of new field boundaries, deeper ploughing, and major drainage works across the entire battlefield site. Two other projects that could also potentially have greatly affected the area are the construction of the sewage works to the west of Pinkie mains and, perhaps more importantly, the construction of the Great North British east coast railway line between Edinburgh and Newcastle which necessitated the construction of a long and deep cutting across the battlefield landscape during the 1840s.

History Tomorrow was commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd to bring together an number of different experts in fields like history, ecology, and soil science to produce an inter-disciplinary report on the battle site, to better inform long-term planning decisions.

Edinburgh Castle military monuments II

Following our first report on the military monuments on the esplanade of Edinburgh Castle, History Tomorrow was commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd to investigate the provenance of another monument located close to the esplanade, the Swedish Runestone, amid concerns about possible damage to the stone.

Hazlebank Quarry Enquiry

 

This report was commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd in advance of objections raised against the extension of Hazlebank Quarry, Stow. The extension to the quarry was approved in 2010.

A History of Leith Piers

This report was commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd and was designed to investigate the history of the West Pier in Leith Harbour. Perhaps the most obvious problem in undertaking this research was peeling back the multi layers of development that have been undertaken at Leith and trying to determine what exactly various people had defined as a ‘West Pier’ across time. The report traces the history of these structures from the sixteenth century to the demolishment of the West Pier after 1962.

The 'Old Kirk', North Berwick

Addyman Archaeology commissioned History Scotland to investigate the history of the site known as 'Old Kirk', North Berwick, in advance of the construction of the Scottish Seabird Centre. This is the earliest known medieval parish church at North Berwick and it was dedicated to St Andrew. The results of this inter-disciplinary investigation are now due to be published as an Oxbow Monograph.

Lothian Friarsdykes Report

This report, commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd, investigated the history of a site known as 'Friarsdykes', in Lothian. This research was undertaken as part of an archaeological watching brief and subsequent mitigation works during the construction of Crystal Rig II wind farm in the Lammermuir Hills. The site's archaeological mitigation report can be found here.

Prestongrange Volunteer Training I

Photograph: The old brick kiln at Prestongrange

This was a bespoke training package offered across ten weeks to the volunteers associated with the HLF-funded Prestongrange project. During this period, Dr Alasdair Ross offered them sustained training in post-1700 palaeography (old handwriting) so that they might access the National Archives of Scotland for themselves and undertake their own community-related historic research projects with a high degree of confidence.

Prestongrange Volunteer Training II

Photograph: The Mining Museum at Prestongrange, looking north to Fife

This was the second bespoke training package offered by us to volunteers on the HLF-funded Prestongrange project. This consisted of training in Oral History techniques, again across a ten week period, by Dr James Smyth. This was a very popular and successful option and the volunteers subsequently interviewed people who had worked at the Prestongrange site before it closed.

Langhope Rigg Windfarm Enquiry

This report was commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd, in advance of a public enquiry into a wind farm development application at Langhope Rigg. History Tomorrow was tasked with investigating the history of the site for the developer; the application was approved and construction began in Autumn 2013.

Kilmun Church Report

In 2010 History Tomorrow was commissioned to work along with GUARD on the historic site of Kilmun church in Argyll, the site of the Campbell family mausoleum from at least the fifteenth century. Our job was to research the written history of the site and the remaining structures, while GUARD undertook the preliminary archaeology. Since this work was undertaken, the local community has received HLF funding to further investigate the site.

Upland Visions

This project consisted of a virtual landscape visualisation for the Scottish Wildlife Trust to determine in what ways 'degraded' upland landscapes might be restored to a more 'natural' habitat through sensitive management and intervention.

Snare Free Scotland

The brief for this report was to ask what the implications might be in economic terms for commercial shooting in Scotland were snaring to be entirely banned. The structure of this report was firstly to establish in which sectors of the shooting industry in Scotland snaring is used, and which were at risk, or so it is held, from predation which snaring could help to control. It focuses on the use of snares in relation to game shooting in Scotland. It also looks at what significance their use has in the control of predators (such as foxes) which, it is argued, can and do take a toll of nesting or young birds, whether wild (as on the grouse moor) or reared, thus reducing the stock of birds for shooting and therefore, or so it is hypothesised, the viability of commercial shooting, with knock on effects for employment and income. An assessment is then offered just how much income is in fact at risk were snares to be withdrawn from use.

Baliscate Chapel, Mull, Time Team

In May 2009 Dr Alasdair Ross was invited to join a dig on Mull at Balliscate, undertaken by the now sadly-missed Time Team.
During the course of the investigation an early Celtic chapel was uncovered, together with a fragment of a Celtic cross, possibly eighth century in date (see below). The site does not appear to be associated with the Columban settlement on Iona and an excavation report can be found here.

Inverailort Oral History Report

In 2011 History Tomorrow was commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd to undertake a series of interviews with people associated with the Marine Harvest site at Inverailort, and to undertake research about the old Commando training camp which used to be located next to Inverailort House (see above). These two reports are available, but that produced from the actual tapes has been anonymized.

Mortonhall Barracks Report

 

This is a desk-based report, commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd, of the archives held in Scotland that relate to Mortonhall Army Camp. The camp was used during both World Wars before being turned over to house displaced Europeans after 1945. The initial archaeological report can be found here and the History Tomorrow report can also be downloaded. An article on this site has  been accepted for the Journal of Conflict Archaeology and is available here.

Bannockburn Report Ltd

 

This report was undertaken for CFA Archaeology Ltd in advance of a proposed housing development on the outskirts of Bannockburn. Though still confidential, History Tomorrow was asked to evaluate both the contemporary evidence relating to the battle and modern interpretations of that evidence.‌

Ochils Landscape Partnership Training I

The Ochils Landscape Partnership employed History Tomorrow to train a group of local volunteers in post-1600 Palaeography across Autumn 2012. This course was suitable both for beginners and for those wishing to brush up on existing skills, and it aimed to equip the volunteers with one of the key skills they would need if they were going to travel to the National Archives to undertake their own local history projects.

Ochils Landscape Partnership Training II

This second training package delivered by History Tomorrow for the Ochils Landscape Partnership (OLP) volunteers aimed to equip them with the skills required to undertake Oral History interviews within the OLP area. This training was delivered during Autumn 2012 by Dr James Smyth.

Riddle's Court I

While a lot of previous research has been undertaken on the history and architecture of the sixteenth century Edinburgh property know known as Riddle’s Court, to date the historical evidence has not been systematically researched. This, the first of our reports on this property, concentrated on the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries alone and it was commissioned by the Scottish Historic Buildings Trust to supplement the archaeological investigations undertaken by CFA Archaeology Ltd. The photograph above shows the top of the great stone arch gateway to Riddle's Court and the words Vivendo Discimus (By Living We Learn), inscribed upon it during the period that the property was owned by Patrick Geddes.

Riddle's Court II

While a lot of previous research has been undertaken on the history and architecture of the sixteenth century Edinburgh property know known as Riddle’s Court, to date the historical evidence has not been systematically researched. This, the second of our reports on this property, concentrated on the eighteenth century alone and it was commissioned by the Scottish Historic Buildings Trust to supplement the archaeological investigations undertaken by CFA Archaeology Ltd. The photograph above shows the entranceway to Riddle's Court from the Lawnmarket.

Riddle's Court III

While a lot of previous research has been undertaken on the history and architecture of the sixteenth century Edinburgh property know known as Riddle’s Court, to date the historical evidence has not been systematically researched. This, the third of our reports on this property, concentrated on the nineteenth and twentieth centuries and it was commissioned by the Scottish Historic Buildings Trust to supplement the archaeological investigations undertaken by CFA Archaeology Ltd. The photograph above shows Victoria Street and the back of the property of Riddles Court, demonstrating the extent of the gardens (and depth of soil) that used to belong to the property which were lost when Victoria Street was created.

Potterraw / South College Street, Edinburgh

History Tomorrow was commissioned by CFA Archaeology Ltd to look for historical evidence relating to nos. 18 – 22 Potterraw (the site of new student accommodation), Edinburgh, which would accompany and supplement a post-excavation site report. This research was concentrated on materials held in the National Archives Scotland and by Edinburgh City Archive and, on the instruction of the client, investigated nineteenth century material alone.

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