Teaching Qualification in Further Education (TQFE)

Candidate support starts prior to the start of the programme via the ‘academic induction’ session that takes place on college premises.  The ‘academic induction’ session is an important mechanism for highlighting the demands of the course to candidates and in providing candidates with an opportunity to ask questions and clarify aspects of the course that are of particular concern to them.  During the academic induction session candidates will review a short piece of academic writing and self-evaluate their own writing.  Guidance will be provided on issues such as different forms of academic writing, identifying and making use of appropriate sources, interpreting marking criteria and avoiding plagiarism.  Overall, the aim of the ‘academic induction’ session is to ensure that candidates are fully informed about the course and can start the course with confidence about what is required of them.

At the start of the course an ‘administrative induction’ session is offered during which the support provided by various areas of the university is outlined.  Candidates are encouraged to meet with support staff as part of this day to identify particular support needs and to agree how these support needs will be met.  Support staff are located in in different ‘teams’ throughout the university and further information can be found here

Avis, J., Fisher, R., & Thompson, R. (2009) Teaching in Lifelong Learning A Guide to Theory and Practice. Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill International (UK) Ltd.

Ecclestone, K., & National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (England and Wales) (2005) Understanding assessment and qualifications in post-compulsory education and training : principles, politics and practice (2nd ed.). Leicester: NIACE.

Gregson, M., & Hillier, Y. (2015) Reflective teaching in further, adult and vocational education (4th. ed.). London: Bloomsbury.

Gregson, M., Nixon, L., Pollard, A., & Spedding, T. (Eds.). (2015) Readings for Reflective teaching in further, adult and vocational education (4th. ed.). London: Bloomsbury.

Huddleston, P., & Unwin, L. (2013) Teaching and learning in further education diversity and change (4th ed.). New York: Routledge.

Tusting, K., & Barton, D. (2006) Models of adult learning : a literature review. Leicester: NIACE.

Weyers, M. (2006) Teaching the FE Curriculum. London: Continuum.

Avis, J., Fisher, R., & Thompson, R. (2009) Teaching in Lifelong Learning A Guide to Theory and Practice. Maidenhead: McGraw-Hill International (UK) Ltd.

Ecclestone, K., & National Institute of Adult Continuing Education (England and Wales) (2005) Understanding assessment and qualifications in post-compulsory education and training : principles, politics and practice (2nd ed.). Leicester: NIACE.

Gregson, M., & Hillier, Y. (2015) Reflective teaching in further, adult and vocational education (4th. ed.). London: Bloomsbury.

Gregson, M., Nixon, L., Pollard, A., & Spedding, T. (Eds.). (2015) Readings for Reflective teaching in further, adult and vocational education (4th. ed.). London: Bloomsbury.

Huddleston, P., & Unwin, L. (2013) Teaching and learning in further education diversity and change (4th ed.). New York: Routledge.

Tusting, K., & Barton, D. (2006) Models of adult learning : a literature review. Leicester: NIACE.

Weyers, M. (2006) Teaching the FE Curriculum. London: Continuum.

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