The MSc Social Statistics and Social Research

This course provides an understanding of social research, with a particular focus on social statistics and quantitative methods. The course includes orientation material on social research methods as a whole, and detailed training on a wide range of statistical methods, with advanced modules on data management and emerging priority research areas, such as big data and social network analysis.

Teaching covers the theories behind the methods, and the practical work in using datasets and analysing them with statistical software. Students will gain a variety of highly marketable skills in the areas of social research and social statistics.

We are looking forward to welcoming you onto the programme this year! Before you arrive, you may wish to take a look at the {vacation reading list} to give you a guide for the coming semester. This can be provided on request by the programme secretary. In your first week there will be a full induction session where you will get to meet key staff and a full range of materials will be provided. There is a student handbook and module guides, and you will be given an introduction to the University’s Library, Information and Technology systems. This includes an introduction to our online student resource platform, Succeed. We are keen to make sure you have everything you need, so please contact appliedsocialresearch@stir.ac.uk if you have any questions or requests for more information.

Reading lists

All available core texts for this programme can be found below. Further information will be posted here and on Succeed as soon as it is available. 

Core Texts

Chapter 1 and Chapter 2 of Garner, R. (2005). The Joy of Stats: A Short Guide to Introductory Statistics in the Social Sciences. Peterborough, Can.: Broadview Press.

Chapter 1 and Chapter 2 of Wright, D. B., & London, K. (2009). First (and Second) Steps in Statistics. London: Sage.

Core Texts

Hantrais, L (2008) International Comparative Research: Theory, Methods and Practice.  Basingstoke: Palgrave.

Øyen, E (ed) (1990) Comparative Methodology: Theory and practice in international social research. London:  Sage.

Ragin, C (1994) Constructing Social Research. Thousand Oaks: Pine Forge Press. (see Chapter 5)

Robertson, D (2008) Looking into Housing: A practical guide to housing research. Coventry: Chartered Institute of Housing / Housing Studies Association. (see Chapter 13)

Esping-Andersen, G (1990)The Three Worlds of Welfare Capitalism.London: Polity Press.

Core Texts

Ridley-Duff, R. & Bull, M. (2011) Understanding Social Enterprise, London: Sage (Chs. 1, 2, 3, 7)

Martin, F. & Thompson, M. (2010) Social Enterprise, Basingstoke: Palgrave MacMillan (Ch. 1)

Denny, S. & Seddon, F. (2014) Social Enterprise, Abingdon: Routledge (Parts 3, 4, 5)

Nicholls, A. (2005) Social Entrepreneurship, Oxford: Oxford University Press (Chs. 3, 4)

Gunn, R. & Durkin, C. (2010) Social Entrepreneurship, Bristol: Policy Press (Ch. 3)

Kickul, J. & Lyons, T. (2012) Understanding Social Entrepreneurship Abingdon: Routledge (Ch. 2)

Guo, C. & Bielefield, W. (2014) Social Entrepreneurship: An Evidence-based Approach to Creating Social Value, London:Wiley (Ch. 10)

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