Research output

Article in Journal ()

Entrepreneurship in the UK

Citation
Blanchflower D & Shadforth C (2007) Entrepreneurship in the UK, Foundations and Trends in Entrepreneurship, 3 (4), pp. 257-364.

Abstract
This paper examines the causes and consequences of changes in the incidence of entrepreneurship in the UK. Self-employment as a proportion of total employment is high by international standards in the UK, but the share has fluctuated over time. We examine the time series movements in self-employment, which are principally driven by financial liberalization and changes in taxation rules, especially as they relate to the construction sector which is the dominant sector. We document that the median earnings of the self-employed is less than for employees. We show that in comparison with employees the self-employed are more likely to be males; immigrants; work in construction or financial activities; hold an apprenticeship; work in London; work long hours; have high levels of job satisfaction and happiness. Consistent with the existence of capital constraints on potential and actual entrepreneurs, the estimates imply that the probability of self-employment depends positively upon whether the individual ever received an inheritance or gift. Evidence is also found that rising house prices have increased the self-employment rate. There appears to be no evidence that changes in self-employment are correlated with changes in real GDP, nor national happiness.

StatusPublished
AuthorsBlanchflower David, Shadforth Chris
Publication date2007
URLhttp://www.scopus.com/…0089f6ab69131eb0
PublisherNow Publishers
ISSN 1551-3114
LanguageEnglish

Journal
Foundations and Trends in Entrepreneurship: Volume 3, Issue 4 (2007)

© University of Stirling FK9 4LA Scotland UK • Telephone +44 1786 473171 • Scottish Charity No SC011159
My Portal