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Differences in self-assessed health by socioeconomic group amongst people with and without a history of cancer: an analysis using representative data from Scotland

Citation
Atherton I, Evans J, Dibben CJL, Woods L & Hubbard G (2012) Differences in self-assessed health by socioeconomic group amongst people with and without a history of cancer: an analysis using representative data from Scotland, Journal of Cancer Survivorship, 6 (4), pp. 458-467.

Abstract

Introduction - This paper considers socioeconomic inequalities in self-assessed health amongst people with and without a history of cancer using representative data from Scotland.

Methods - A cross-sectional analysis using the Scottish Health Survey was done. Cancer survivors were identified using linked Cancer Registry data. Bivariate and multivariate analysis was used to compare and contrast self-assessed health amongst those with a history of cancer to those without.

Results - Of the 17,505 survey participants, 432 (2.5 %) had a history of cancer. After taking into account potential confounders, those in the lowest socioeconomic group were more likely to report poor health than those in the highest group amongst those with a history of cancer [odds ratio, 2.96; confidence interval (CI), 1.82–4.80] and those with no history of cancer (odds ratio, 2.45; CI, 2.21–2.71). Those in the lowest socioeconomic group with no history of cancer had a greater propensity to report poor health than any of the highest groups that did have a history of cancer (p less than 0.01). Differences in propensities to indicate poor health were particularly marked amongst those 4 years or more post-cancer diagnosis.

Conclusions - Findings underline the scale of socioeconomic gradients in health. That disparities were so wide amongst those most temporally distant from initial diagnosis is particularly a concern given improving survival after a cancer diagnosis.

Implications for cancer survivors - Socioeconomic circumstances have a considerable influence on health and well-being. Practitioners and policy makers should consider socioeconomic circumstances in considering approaches to health and social care of cancer survivors.

Keywords
Self-assessed health; Cancer survivors; Socioeconomic differences; Inequalities

StatusPublished
AuthorsAtherton Iain, Evans Josie, Dibben Christopher J L, Woods Laura, Hubbard Gill
Publication date12/2012
Publication date online10/07/2012
Date accepted by journal02/05/2012
PublisherSpringer Verlag
ISSN 1932-2259
LanguageEnglish

Journal
Journal of Cancer Survivorship: Volume 6, Issue 4

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