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The nutritional value of lipids in various tropical aquatic animals from rice-fish farming systems in northeast Thailand

Citation
Karapanagiotidis IT, Yakupitiyage A, Little DC, Bell M & Mente E (2010) The nutritional value of lipids in various tropical aquatic animals from rice-fish farming systems in northeast Thailand, Journal of Food Composition and Analysis, 23 (1), pp. 1-8.

Abstract
Knowledge on the lipid compositions of tropical freshwater aquatic animals is limited despite their importance in the human diet and the health-related benefits of fish lipids. This study examines the lipid content and fatty acid composition from the edible muscle tissue of some common freshwater aquatic animals that inhabit rice fields in Thailand, namely snakehead (Channa striatus), Gunther's walking catfish (Clarias macrocephalus), climbing perch (Anabas testudineus), blackline rasbora (Rasbora borapetensis), swamp barb (Puntius brevis), and freshwater prawn (Macrobrachium nipponense). All specimens were low in muscle fat (≤1.1% of wet weight). There was considerable variation in the fatty acid composition between species. All species were good sources of the essential fatty acids, and particularly of C22:6n-3 (5.2–13.3% total FA) and C20:4n-6 (7.2–14.6% total FA), signifying their high nutritional quality for human nutrition. The findings indicate that strategies for rural development, food security, and alleviation of poverty in rural areas need to pay special attention to the management of aquatic resources to ensure the health and well-being of rural people.

Keywords
Lipids; Fatty acids; Fish nutrition; Freshwater fish; Aquaculture; Rice culture; Fisheries; Tropics; Food Security; Sustainable agriculture practice; Food analysis; Food composition

StatusPublished
AuthorsKarapanagiotidis Ioannis T, Yakupitiyage Amararatne, Little David Colin, Bell Michael, Mente Eleni
Publication date02/2010
PublisherElsevier
ISSN 0889-1575
LanguageEnglish

Journal
Journal of Food Composition and Analysis: Volume 23, Issue 1 (FEB 2010)

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