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Article in Journal ()

The Impact of TV Mass Media Campaigns on Calls to a National Quitline and the Use of Prescribed Nicotine Replacement Therapy: A Structural Vector Autoregression Analysis

Citation
Haghpanahan H, Mackay DF, Pell J, Bell D, Langley T & Haw S (2017) The Impact of TV Mass Media Campaigns on Calls to a National Quitline and the Use of Prescribed Nicotine Replacement Therapy: A Structural Vector Autoregression Analysis, Addiction, 112 (7), pp. 1229-1237.

Abstract
Aims 

To estimate (1) the immediate impact; (2) the cumulative impact; and (3) the duration of impact of Scottish tobacco control TV mass media campaigns (MMCs) on smoking cessation activity, as measured by calls to Smokeline and the volume of prescribed nicotine replacement therapy (NRT). 
Design 
Multivariate time–series analysis using secondary data on population level measures of exposure to TV MMCs broadcast and smoking cessation activity between 2003 and 2012. 
Setting and participants 
Population of Scotland. 
Measurements 
Adult television viewer ratings (TVRs) as a measure of exposure to Scottish mass media campaigns in the adult population; monthly calls to NHS Smokeline; and the monthly volume of prescribed NRT as measured by gross ingredient costs (GIC). 
Findings 
Tobacco control TVRs were associated with an increase in calls to Smokeline but not an increase in the volume of prescribed NRT. A 1 standard deviation (SD) increase of 194 tobacco control TVRs led to an immediate and significant increase of 385.9 [95% confidence interval (CI)=171.0, 600.7] calls to Smokeline (unadjusted model) within 1month. When adjusted for seasonality the impact was reduced, but the increase in calls remained significant (226.3 calls, 95% CI=37.3, 415.3). The cumulative impact on Smokeline calls remained significant for 6months after broadcast in the unadjusted model and 18months in the adjusted model. However, an increase in tobacco control TVRs of 194 failed to have a significant impact on the GIC of prescribed NRT in either the unadjusted (£1361.4, 95% CI=–£9138.0, £11860.9) or adjusted (£6297.1, 95% CI=–£2587.8, £15182.1) models. 
Conclusions 
Tobacco control television mass media campaigns broadcast in Scotland between 2003 and 2012 were effective in triggering calls to Smokeline, but did not increase significantly the use of prescribed nicotine replacement therapy by adult smokers. The impact on calls to Smokeline occurred immediately within 1month of broadcast and was sustained for at least 6months.

Keywords
Mass media campaign; multivariate time–series analysis; NRT; smoking cessation; structural vector autoregressive model; tobacco control

StatusPublished
AuthorsHaghpanahan Houra, Mackay Daniel F, Pell Jill, Bell David, Langley Tessa, Haw Sally
Publication date07/2017
Publication date online16/03/2017
Date accepted by journal08/02/2017
PublisherWiley-Blackwell
ISSN 0965-2140
LanguageEnglish

Journal
Addiction: Volume 112, Issue 7

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