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Article in Journal

Cognitive stimulation therapy in dementia care: an exploration of barriers and facilitators to implementation in practice using Normalisation Process Theory (Under Review)

Citation
Dickinson C, Gibson G, Gotts Z, Stobbart L & Robinson L (2017) Cognitive stimulation therapy in dementia care: an exploration of barriers and facilitators to implementation in practice using Normalisation Process Theory (Under Review), British Journal of Psychiatry.

Abstract
Background 

Cognitive stimulation therapy (CST) is an evidence-based, cost-effective psychosocial intervention for people with dementia but is not routinely offered in post-diagnostic care. 
Aims 
To explore the barriers and facilitators to implementation of CST in dementia services. 
Method 
34 semi-structured interviews (24 participants) were conducted across 4 sites in the North of England; 10 were follow up interviews. Data were analysed using thematic analysis and mapped to Normalisation Process Theory. 
Results 
Participants found CST easy to understand and a good fit with existing models of care. Training in CST and seeing benefits for clients were important motivators. Time and resources were crucial for the successful implementation of CST. Participants were keen to measure outcomes but unsure how to do this. 
Conclusions 
Despite being an effective intervention and a ‘good fit’ with dementia services, CST is still not a core component of ‘usual’ care; further research is needed to ascertain why.

StatusSubmitted
AuthorsDickinson Claire, Gibson Grant, Gotts Zoe, Stobbart Lynne, Robinson Louise
Publication date online2017
PublisherRoyal College of Psychiatrists
ISSN 0007-1250
LanguageEnglish

Journal
British Journal of Psychiatry

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