Research output

Article in Newspaper/Magazine

How old church records are helping us to assess the impact of childhood disease and why we’re living longer

Citation
Hayward A (2016) How old church records are helping us to assess the impact of childhood disease and why we’re living longer, The Conversation, 15.8.2016.

Abstract

First paragraph: The Great Exhibition of 1851, housed in London’s Crystal Palace, showcased the newest of culture and science – including the world’s largest diamond, a precursor to the fax machine and barometer which worked entirely through leeches. Living conditions were tough, but having survived to the age of 20, a young Londoner attending the exhibition could expect to live until around 60. A century and a half later, 20-year-old Londoners watching the Olympics down the pub can expect to live to the age of 80.
Access this article on The Conversation website: https://theconversation.com/how-old-church-records-are-helping-us-to-assess-the-impact-of-childhood-disease-and-why-were-living-longer-63741

StatusPublished
AuthorsHayward Adam
Publication date online15/08/2016
URLhttps://theconversation.com/…ing-longer-63741
PublisherThe Conversation Trust
Place of publicationLondon
ISSN No ISSN
LanguageEnglish

Journal
the Conversation

© University of Stirling FK9 4LA Scotland UK • Telephone +44 1786 473171 • Scottish Charity No SC011159
My Portal