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Article in Journal ()

For better or for worse: The moderating effects of personality on the marriage-life satisfaction link

Citation
Boyce CJ, Wood AM & Ferguson E (2016) For better or for worse: The moderating effects of personality on the marriage-life satisfaction link, Personality and Individual Differences, 97, pp. 61-66.

Abstract
On average, marriage tends to lead to temporary increases in life satisfaction, which quickly return to pre-marital levels. This general pattern, however, does not consider the personality of individuals entering into marriage. We examine whether following marriage pre-marital personality predicts different changes to life satisfaction in a sample of initially single German adults (N=2015), completing life satisfaction measures and indicating their marital status yearly for 8years (during which 468 married). We find that conscientious women experience greater life satisfaction following marriage than less conscientious women. Our data also indicate that introverted women and extraverted men experience longer-term life satisfaction benefits following marriage. Our results refute the claim of limited life satisfaction effects from marriage and caution against relying on average effects when examining the influence of life events on well-being.

Keywords
Marriage; Life satisfaction; Personality; Subjective well-being; Adaptation

StatusPublished
AuthorsBoyce Christopher J, Wood Alex M, Ferguson Eamonn
Publication date07/2016
Publication date online19/03/2016
Date accepted by journal03/03/2016
PublisherElsevier
ISSN 0191-8869
LanguageEnglish

Journal
Personality and Individual Differences: Volume 97

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