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Article in Journal ()

Being sub-culturally authentic and acceptable to the mainstream: Civilizing practices and self-authentication

Citation
Healy M & Beverland M (2016) Being sub-culturally authentic and acceptable to the mainstream: Civilizing practices and self-authentication, Journal of Business Research, 69 (1), pp. 224-233.

Abstract
The practices used by members of consumer tribes to achieve mainstream acceptance remain under-researched. Consumers seek tribal membership as part of a larger life theme or identity goal, yet the divergent nature of their tribe may hinder this desire for self-authentication. The research examines how members of one consumer tribe, Furries (or anthromorphs), “come out” with outsiders, thereby taking the ultimate transformative step. The findings demonstrate that Furries desire to disclose is framed around three competing concerns: being true to oneself, true to the tribe, and compassionate to outsiders. In balancing both egosystem and ecosystem goals Furries engage in three civilizing practices: reframing, spiritualizing, and playfulness. These practices enable members of consumer tribes to remain true to themselves but also expand the boundaries of their identities thereby gaining the mass acceptance they desire as part of a larger life theme.

Keywords
Civilizing; Disclosure; Self-authentication; Transformation; Tribes; Zoomorphism.

StatusPublished
AuthorsHealy Michael, Beverland Michael
Publication date01/2016
Publication date online24/08/2015
Date accepted by journal01/06/2015
PublisherElsevier
ISSN 0148-2963
LanguageEnglish

Journal
Journal of Business Research: Volume 69, Issue 1

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