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Article in Journal ()

Smoking cessation and socioeconomic status: An update of existing evidence from a national evaluation of english stop smoking services

Citation
Hiscock R, Dobbie F & Bauld L (2015) Smoking cessation and socioeconomic status: An update of existing evidence from a national evaluation of english stop smoking services, BioMed Research International, 2015, Art. No.: 274056.

Abstract
Smokers from lower socioeconomic groups are less likely to be successful in stopping smoking than more affluent smokers, even after accessing cessation programmes. Data were analysed from 3057 clients of nine services. Routine monitoring data were expanded with CO validated smoking status at 52-week follow-up. Backwards logistic regression modelling was used to consider which factors were most important in explaining the relationship between SES and quitting. The odds ratio of stopping smoking among more affluent clients, compared with more disadvantaged clients, after taking into account design variables only, was 1.85 (95% CI 1.44 to 2.37) which declined to 1.44 (1.11 to 1.87) when all controls were included. The factors that explained more than 10% of the decline in the odds ratio were age, proportion of friends and family who smoked, nicotine dependence, and taking varenicline. A range of factors contribute to lower cessation rates for disadvantaged smokers. Some of these can be modified by improved smoking cessation service provision, but others require contributions from wider efforts to improve material, human, and social capital.

StatusPublished
AuthorsHiscock Rosemary, Dobbie Fiona, Bauld Linda
Publication date2015
Date accepted by journal03/05/2015
PublisherHindawi Publishing Corporation
ISSN 2314-6133
LanguageEnglish

Journal
Biomed Research International: Volume 2015 (2015)

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