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Training-Induced Changes in Subsequent Memory Effects: No Major Differences Among Children, Younger Adults, and Older Adults

Citation
Brehmer Y, Shing YL, Heekeren HR, Lindenberger U & Backman L (2016) Training-Induced Changes in Subsequent Memory Effects: No Major Differences Among Children, Younger Adults, and Older Adults, NeuroImage, 131, pp. 214-225.

Abstract
The neural correlates of encoding mode, or the state of forming new memory episodes, have been found to change with age and mnemonic training. However, it is unclear whether neural correlates of encoding success, termed subsequent memory (SM) effects, also differ by age and mnemonic skill. In a multi-session training study, we investigated whether SM effects are altered by instruction and training in a mnemonic skill, and whether such alterations differ among children, younger adults, and older adults. Before and after strategy training, fMRI data were collected while participants were memorizing word pairs. In all age groups, participants receiving training showed greater performance gains than control group participants. Analysis of task-relevant regions showed training-induced reductions in SM effects in left frontal regions. Reductions in SM effects largely generalized across age, and primarily reflected greater training-induced activation increases for omissions than for remembered items, indicating that training resulted in more consistent use of the mnemonic strategy. The present results reveal no major age differences in SM effects in children, younger adults, and older adults.

Keywords
episodic memory; training; subsequent memory effect; functional magnetic resonance imaging; lifespan

StatusPublished
AuthorsBrehmer Yvonne, Shing Yee Lee, Heekeren Hauke R, Lindenberger Ulman, Backman Lars
Publication date01/05/2016
Publication date online07/12/2015
Date accepted by journal30/11/2015
URLhttp://www.sciencedirect.com/…1053811915011118
PublisherElsevier
ISSN 1053-8119
LanguageEnglish

Journal
Neuroimage: Volume 131

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