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Assessment of physicochemical properties and metal contents of water and sediments of Bodo Creek, Niger Delta, Nigeria. Toxicological & Environmental Chemistry

Citation
Vincent-Akpu IF, Tyler A, Wilson C & Mackinnon G (2015) Assessment of physicochemical properties and metal contents of water and sediments of Bodo Creek, Niger Delta, Nigeria. Toxicological & Environmental Chemistry, Toxicological and Environmental Chemistry, 97 (2), pp. 135-144.

Abstract
Some physico-chemical properties and the concentrations of the metals Fe, Mn, Ni, Cd, Cr, Co, Cu, Pb, and Zn in water and sediments were examined from September 2011 to January 2012 in Bodo Creek, where oil spills have been recurrent. Temperature, pH, total dissolved solid, conductivity, salinity, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total hardness, sulfate, nitrate, and phosphate were determined in surface water. Particle size, total organic matter (TOM), and pH were also determined in the sediments. The parameters were within permissible limits except the mean values of BOD, COD, total hardness, and sulfate that exceeded levels permissible for domestic use. The sediments consisted mainly of sand, with TOM ranging from 0.2% to 5.5%. With the exception of cadmium that was below detection limit, metal levels (mg kg¡1) in the sediments were 12 (Mn), 1070 (Fe), 10 (Cu), 10 (Zn), 5.3 (Cr), 1.1 (Pb), 1.0 (Ni), and 0.5 (Co) while in water they were 24, 98, 21, 6.9, 4.0, 0.6, 0.18, and 0.16, respectively. The latter were higher than World Health Organization recommended permissible levels for both surface and drinking water.

Keywords
trace metals; oil spill; water permissible levels; sediment particle size; contamination

StatusPublished
AuthorsVincent-Akpu Ijeoma Favour, Tyler Andrew, Wilson Clare, Mackinnon Gillian
Publication date2015
Publication date online18/05/2015
Date accepted by journal13/04/2015
PublisherTaylor and Francis
ISSN 0277-2248
LanguageEnglish

Journal
Toxicological and Environmental Chemistry: Volume 97, Issue 2

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