Intermediate Microeconomics

Module Code ECNU211
Semester Autumn
Prerequisite ECNU111
Level 8
Credit Value 20
Module Co-ordinator Dr Theo Diasakos 
Assessment

The coursework assessment comprises two class tests. A grade will be awarded for each test and an average coursework grade will be computed by weighting the two tests equally.

  • If you gain an overall coursework average of at least 65%, you will be exempt from the examination. Your final grade will be your overall coursework grade.
  • If you do not meet the above condition, you should take the examination. Your module grade will be computed by weighting the components of assessment as follows: coursework 40%, examination 60%. You must get a weighted grade of at least 40% for an overall module pass.

MODULE INTRODUCTION, AIMS AND OBJECTIVES

The introductory microeconomics module ECNU211 gives a broad introduction to microeconomics. This module presents a more formal treatment of the foundations of microeconomic theory, with the aim of providing a deeper insight into the nature of economic theorising, introducing key results and methods of analysis that will be developed in later economic modules and providing a preview of the issues discussed in these modules. The main topics are consumer choice theory and the theory of production and costs.

LEARNING OUTCOMES AND SKILLS DEVELOPED

On completion of this module, students should be able to:

  • To develop consumer choice theory from its key assumptions.
  • To derive the main results about demand.
  • To explain the Slutsky Equation.
  • To show how consumer choice theory can be applied to a range of economic problems in areas such as labour supply and cost-benefit analysis.
  • To show how a market equilibrium can be deduced.
  • To develop the theory of costs and production.

RECOMMENDED READING LIST

The core text book for this module is:

  •  Intermediate Microeconomics by Hal R. Varian 9th (2014) - ISBN 978-0-393-12396-8

 Additional readings:

  •  Intermediate Microeconomics by R. Mochrie (2016) - ISBN 978-1-137-00844-2
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