MSc in Finance

Academic Year 2017/18

Structure and Content

This one-year, full-time programme has an initial taught component of two 15-week semesters, involving lectures, practical case study work and workshops, followed by a supervised dissertation. In the autumn semester you will take the following modules:

  • Financial Reporting: Provides an appreciation of the underlying assumptions and limitations of accounting information. Measurement and reporting problems involved in financial accounting ‘solutions’ adopted by regulators are discussed. Methods for interpretation of reported accounting information are explored and applied to ‘live’ data
  • Corporate Finance: Provides an understanding of how corporations raise finance (debt and equity) and invest money (capital budgeting). Also examines other major decision areas of corporate finance and how these affect the value of the firm
  • Quantitative Methods in Finance: Provides the statistical and computing skills to fully understand modern banking and finance operations. Spreadsheets are used to manipulate statistical models and estimate linear models
  • Economics for Banking and Finance: Introduces students to economics as a discipline, assuming no prior knowledge of economics, and focuses on aspects most relevant to a career in finance

In the spring semester you will choose 70 credits from: 

  • Introduction to Research Methods: Introduces students to generic and subject-specific research training. It also aims to prepare students for the dissertation module as well as to lay the foundations for more advanced postgraduate research
  • Empirical Methods in Finance and Accounting: Introduces students to econometrics techniques required to undertake research in finance and to understand empirical papers published in academic journals. It also prepares students for the dissertation module as well as lays the foundations for more advanced postgraduate research.
  • Financial Statement Analysis: Develops skills in the interpretation and use of financial statements, focusing on company valuation and identification of companies that may become insolvent. It includes a project where a group of students work together to write and present an investment analysis report on a UK Quoted Company
  • Derivatives: Focuses on the uses and the pricing of the key derivative instruments: options, futures, forwards and swaps
  • Mergers and Acquisitions: Provides an understanding of the motivation for and consequences of mergers and acquisitions against the background of corporate finance theory and practice. Focuses on the financial and economic aspects of M and A activity and other forms of corporate restructuring, such as spin-offs, carve-outs, and sell-offs
  • Behavioural Finance: The aim of this module is to provide students with an alternative perspective to traditional finance theory based on rational decision-making. Drawing on insights from psychology the module explores the impact of psychological heuristics and biases on investor behaviour and asset pricing.
  • Investments - Equity Portfolios and Pricing: Provides an understanding of equity portfolio management and pricing. Focuses on the valuation of equities and the management of equity portfolios.
  • Investments - Fixed Income and Alternative Investments: Provides an understanding of security valuation and portfolio management. Focuses on the valuation of both fixed-interest securities and issues around alternative investment products such as hedge funds, fund of funds and venture capital.
  • International Corporate Finance: Covers the workings of the foreign exchange market, factors that determine exchange rates, and how corporations may manage their foreign exchange and interest rate risks using a variety of derivative products

Note:
Students must choose at least one 20 credit module from the list.
Financial Statement Analysis must be taken by students planning a case study dissertation.
Students planning a Finance research dissertation are advised to take either Introduction to Research Methods and/or Empirical Methods in Finance and Accounting.

Many modules cover learning outcomes from all three levels of the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA®) programme.

Academic Year 2015/16

Structure and Content

This one-year, full-time programme has an initial taught component of two 15-week semesters, involving lectures, practical case study work and workshops, followed by a supervised dissertation. In the autumn semester you will take the following modules:

  • Financial Reporting: Provides an appreciation of the underlying assumptions and limitations of accounting information. Measurement and reporting problems involved in financial accounting ‘solutions’ adopted by regulators are discussed. Methods for interpretation of reported accounting information are explored and applied to ‘live’ data
  • Corporate Finance: Provides an understanding of how corporations raise finance (debt and equity) and invest money (capital budgeting). Also examines other major decision areas of corporate finance and how these affect the value of the firm
  • Quantitative Methods in Finance: Provides the statistical and computing skills to fully understand modern banking and finance operations. Spreadsheets are used to manipulate statistical models and estimate linear models
  • International Corporate Finance: Covers the workings of the foreign exchange market, factors that determine exchange rates, and how corporations may manage their foreign exchange and interest rate risks using a variety of derivative products

In the spring semester you will take at least one of the following core modules depending on the type of dissertation that you plan to undertake:

  • Research Methods: Introduces students to generic and subject-specific research training. Also prepares for the dissertation module as well as laying the foundations for more advanced postgraduate research
  • Financial Statement Analysis: Develops skills in the interpretation and use of financial statements, focusing on company valuation and identification of companies that may become insolvent. It includes a project where a group of students work together to write and present an investment analysis report on a UK Quoted Company

You will then select two or three from the following modules:

  • Derivatives: Focuses on the uses and the pricing of the key derivative instruments: options, futures, forwards and swaps
  • Investments and Portfolio Management: Provides an understanding of security valuation and portfolio management. Focuses on the valuation of both equities and fixed-interest securities and the management of equity and fixed-interest portfolios
  • Mergers and Acquisitions: Provides an understanding of the motivation for and consequences of mergers and acquisitions against the background of corporate finance theory and practice. Focuses on the financial and economic aspects of M and A activity and other forms of corporate restructuring, such as spin-offs, carve-outs, and sell-offs
  • Behavioural Finance: The aim of this module is to provide students with an alternative perspective to traditional finance theory based on rational decision-making. Drawing on insights from psychology the module explores the impact of psychological heuristics and biases on investor behaviour and asset pricing.
Many modules cover learning outcomes from all three levels of the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA®) programme.
 

Academic Year 2014/15

In the Semester 1 you will take the following modules:

  • Financial Reporting: Provides an appreciation of the underlying assumptions and limitations of accounting information. Measurement and reporting problems involved in financial accounting ‘solutions’ adopted by regulators are discussed. Methods for interpretation of reported accounting information are explored and applied to ‘live’ data
  • Corporate Finance: Provides an understanding of how corporations raise finance (debt and equity) and invest money (capital budgeting). Also examines other major decision areas of corporate finance and how these affect the value of the firm
  • Quantitative Methods in Finance: Provides the statistical and computing skills to fully understand modern banking and finance operations. Spreadsheets are used to manipulate statistical models and estimate linear models
  • International Finance: Covers the workings of the foreign exchange market, factors that determine exchange rates, and how corporations may manage their foreign exchange and interest rate risks using a variety of derivative products

In the Semester 2 you will select at least one of the following core modules depending on the type of dissertation that you plan to undertake:

  • Research Methods: Introduces students to generic and subject-specific research training. Also prepares for the dissertation module as well as laying the foundations for more advanced postgraduate research
  • Financial Statement Analysis: Develops skills in the interpretation and use of financial statements, focusing on company valuation and identification of companies that may become insolvent. It includes a project where a group of students work together to write and present an investment analysis report on a UK Quoted Company

You will then choose two or three from the following modules:

  • Derivatives: Focuses on the uses and the pricing of the key derivative instruments: options, futures, forwards and swaps
  • Investments and Portfolio Management: Provides an understanding of security valuation and portfolio management. Focuses on the valuation of both equities and fixed-interest securities and the management of equity and fixed-interest portfolios
  • Mergers and Acquisitions: Provides an understanding of the motivation for and consequences of mergers and acquisitions against the background of corporate finance theory and practice. Focuses on the financial and economic aspects of M and A activity and other forms of corporate restructuring, such as spin-offs, carve-outs, and sell-offs

Many modules cover learning outcomes from all three levels of the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA®) programme.

 

Delivery and Assessment

Successful completion of the taught modules leads to the award of a Postgraduate Diploma. The Master’s degree is awarded on, in addition, satisfactory completion of a dissertation.

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