Comparative Employment Systems (HRMP005)

This module information is representative of what is included in the module in a given year. Details of actual reading, lectures and coursework may vary year to year and will be available at the beginning of the semester.

 

Module Co-ordinator

Dr Anastasios Hadjisolomou

Semester

Spring

Level

11

Credit value

20

Contact hours

40 contact hours

Assessment

40% Individual assignment
40% Examination 
20% Group presentation

This is a core module enabling students to appreciate the nature and scope of the employment relationship, and to reflect upon the various factors and institutions that contribute to shaping it at national and supra-national levels. The module introduces students to various employment systems; the operation of key actors in the employment relationship at national and international level and the outcomes of processes involving these actors; and economic, social and legal frameworks affecting international employment relations. Implications for the practice of HRM are discussed.

Module Objectives

The module aims to enable students to:

  • Understand and reflect upon the nature and scope of the employment relationship internationally.
  • Understand and analyse a diversity of socio-economic contexts, international regulatory structures, and appreciate their influence on the employment relationship, and HRM practice.
  • Identify and critically assess potential challenges in the regulation of employment systems at national and international levels.
  • Identify and critically assess how the main actors in the employment relationship may organise (nationally and internationally), interact, and what the outcomes of these interactions may be.
  • Identify and critically assess national and international issues affecting employment quality and unemployment.

Learning Outcomes

Specific knowledge and understanding of current developments in the subject.

Students should be able to:

  • Define, explain and analyse a range of international and comparative employment systems, and examine concepts in international settings.
  • Understand and apply key theories of employment relations.
  • Identify international differences in employment relations systems, and analyse the significance and consequences of differing national cultures and institutional, political and legal systems in regulating employment relations systems.
  • Appreciate the scope of international dimensions and international activities impacting upon employment systems (e.g. union bodies, non-union forms of employee representation, employers’ associations, and supranational regulatory bodies).
  • Identify and analyse how the main actors in the employment relationship may organise and interact at the national and international level and what the outcomes of these interactions may be.
  • Critically reflect upon the impact of globalisation on HRM and employment systems.
  • Identify and analyse national and international issues affecting employment quality and unemployment.

Generic and cognitive skills

Written communication; oral communication; time management and organisational skills; critical analysis; research skills; teamworking.

Introductory reading

Dowling, J. Festing, M and Engle A.D. (2013) International Human Resource Management, Cengage, Andover.

 

© University of Stirling FK9 4LA Scotland UK • Telephone +44 1786 473171 • Scottish Charity No SC011159
Portal Logon