HISU9B4 Europe in the Long Nineteenth Century,1789-1914

Module Information:

The module examines a range of  political, social, economic and ideological developments in European history, from the French Revolution until the beginning of the First World War. The module covers major themes from a European perspective – secularisation, democratisation, nationalism, the social question – and focuses on its specific development in a selection of countries, namely France, Germany, Italy, Russia and Spain.

This module aims to provide the student with a strong understanding of the vectors of change which transformed Europe in the nineteenth century and conformed our modern world. The module combines a thematic and a chronological  approach, beginning with a strong emphasis on the specificities of Old Regime societies in Europe and the transformations introduced by the political and economic changes of the Age of Revolution. Students will develop an awareness of the general trends of change in Europe and will work on how these changes operated in one or more European countries. The themes include the Old Regime and Absolutism, the French Revolution, the transformation of Europe during the Napoleonic occupation and wars, the struggles between absolutism and constitutionalism, the effects of nationalism and state building, the origins of the social question and the development of  socialism, the secularisation of society and religious revival, the condition of women and, finally, democratisation.

Pre-requisite:  Two History modules at level 8. 

Core Learning Outcomes

By the end of the course students should be able to:
1. Use with accuracy a range of key historical concepts.
2. Identify and use relevant primary and secondary sources on nineteenth-century European history to test or support a historical case.
3. Relate social and political developments in one area of Europe to these same developments in the whole of the continent.
4. Compare the social and political life of a variety of nineteenth century societies.
5. Take sides in a historiographical debate, using arguments and evidence to compose a case and discard alternative interpretations.

Module Literature:

  • Berger, S. A companion to nineteenth-century Europe: 1789-1914, (Oxford, 2009).
  • Best, G. War and society in revolutionary Europe, 1770-1870, (Stroud, 1998).
  • Blanning, T. C. W. The nineteenth century: Europe 1789-1914 (Oxford, 2000).
  • Hobsbawm, E. J. The age of capital, 1848-1875, (London, 1995).
  • Hobsbawm, E. J. The age of Empire 1875-1914, (London, 1987).
  • Hobsbawm, E. J. The age of revolution: Europe, 1789-1848, (London, 1978).
  • Offen, K. M.  European feminisms, 1700-1950: a political history, (Stanford, 2000).
  • Sperber J. Europe 1850-1914: progress, participation and apprehension, (Harlow, 2009).
  • Sperber J. Revolutionary Europe, 1780-1850, (Harlow, 2000).

 Module Structure:

The module is taught through a lecture and a one-hour tutorial per week.  Attendance at tutorials is compulsory and preparation essential.  All tutorials are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment:

The grade is based on an essay of 2500 words (40%), a two-hour examination (50%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9D4 American History from 1787 to 1890

This module explores the political transformation of the United States during the nineteenth century, focusing on major national debates and the crisis of the Union that tore the nation apart during the Civil War of 1861-65.

The course covers four inter-related historical themes: (i) the democratisation of the political system, (ii) slavery in ante-bellum period, (iii) the Civil War and Reconstruction, and (iv) westward expansion.  Emphasis is placed on political history, examining how Americans contested conflicts of interest pertaining to each theme.

Pre-requisite:  Two History modules at level 8.

Module Literature:

Recommendations for purchase. 

  • Frederick Douglass, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass American Slave (Penguin edition, 1982)
  • George B. Tindall & David E. Shi, America: A Narrative History (Brief 9th edition, 2013, single volume paperback). Module textbook.

Reading for historical themes

  • Ralph K. Andrist, The Long Death: The Last Days of the Plains Indians (1993) ISBN 978-0806133089.
  • E.D. Genovese, Roll Jordan Roll (1976) ISBN 978-0394716527.
  • A.L. Hurtado, & P. Iverson, eds., Major problems in American Indian History (1994) ISBN 0669270490.
  • Peter Kolchin, American Slavery (1995) ISBN 0140241507
  • C.A. Milner ed., The Oxford History of the American West (1994). ISBN 978-0195112122.
  • K. M. Stampp, The Causes of the Civil War (ed.1991). ISBN 978-0671751555.
  • Hugh Tulloch, The Debate on the American Civil War(1999). ISBN 978-0719049385.
  • Sean Wilentz, The Rise of American Democracy, 3 vols. (2007). v.1. The crisis of the new order, 1787-1815 -- v. 2. Democracy ascendant, 1815-1840 -- v. 3. Slavery and the crisis of American democracy, 1840-1860. ISBNs: 9780393930061, 9780393930078, 9780393930085.

 Module Structure: 

The module is taught through a lecture and a one-hour tutorial per week.  Attendance at tutorials is compulsory and preparation essential.  All tutorials are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: 

The grade is based on an essay of 2500 words (40%), a two-hour examination (50%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9E4 Africa in the Nineteenth Century

The module focuses on the impact of European economic penetration, political interference and Christian missionary enterprise upon African societies during the nineteenth century, and the ways in which these interacted with indigenous process of social and political change, with a view to explaining the ultimate establishment of European colonial rule over most of the continent.

Africa in the nineteenth century will be studied from an African perspective focusing on the following topics:
Changing patterns of overseas trade: The decline of the slave trade and the rise of 'legitimate' trade in West Africa (Bonny, the Asante and Dahomey)
Changing patterns of overseas trade: The slave and ivory trades in East Africa (Zanzibar, the Yao and Shambaa, and Mirambo and Nyungu)
Christianity in East and West Africa (South-Eastern Nigeria, Yorubaland and Buganda)
Militant Islam in West Africa and the Nilotic Sudan (Usuman dan Fodio in Hausaland, Islam in Yorubaland, and the Sudanese Mahdiyya)
Political and social change in black societies in Southern Africa - the Mfecane (Shaka and the rise of the Zulus, the Ndebele and the Sotho)
Southern Africa: The Great Trek, White settler societies, and the Mineral Revolution (gold and diamonds in South Africa, and the first Boer War, 1877-1881)
Defensive modernization in Egypt, Ethiopia and the Fante Confederacy
European imperialism and the partition of Africa (West, East and Southern Africa)

Pre-requisite:  Two History modules at level 8.  

Module Literature:

  • R.J. Reid, A history of modern Africa: 1800 to the present (Chichester: Wiley Blackwell, 2009)
  • Robin Law (ed.), From slave trade to 'legitimate commerce': the commercial transition in nineteenth century West Africa (Cambridge: CUP, 1995)
  • John Iliffe, Africans: the history of a continent (Cambridge: CUP, 1995)
  • Ralf Austen, African economic history (London: James Currey, 1987)
  • H.L. Wesseling, The European colonial empires (Harlow: Pearson/Longman, 2004)

Module Structure: 

The module is taught through a lecture and a one-hour tutorial per week.  Attendance at tutorials is compulsory and preparation essential.  All tutorials are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: 

The grade is based on an essay of 2500 words (40%), a two-hour examination (50%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9G4 Everyday Life in Victorian Britain – Hands on History

Module Content:  This module examines various aspects of life in Victorian cities using computer methods of analysis. Topics covered include: health and housing issues; child labour and the expansion of state education; immigration and emigration; poverty; the social position of women; and the Victorian census.

Learning Outcomes:  The module aims to examine the social history of Victorian industrial cities, and to deepen historical skills further through application of computer methods.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9 or 10.  No previous computer knowledge is required.  Not available to students who have completed HISU9G4.

Module Literature:  It is advisable to purchase some or all of the following books which will serve as an introduction to the subject matter and as text books for the module:

  • G. Best, Mid Victorian Britain 1851-1875 (1985).
  • W.H. Fraser and R.J. Morris (ed.), People and Society in Scotland vol. II - 1830-1914 (1990).
  • K. Gleadle, British Women in the Nineteenth Century (2001).
  • E. Higgs, Making Sense of the Census – Revisited (2005).
  • E. Royle, Modern Britain : a social history 1750-1997 (second edn., 1997).
  • T.C. Smout, A Century of the Scottish People 1830-1950 (1986).

Module Structure:  The module is taught through a mixture of seminars and laboratory sessions of two-hours each per week.  Attendance at seminars is compulsory.  All seminars/laboratory sessions are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment:  The grade is based on an essay of 3000 words (40%), a two-hour examination (50%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9Q4: Scotland in the Age of Wallace and Bruce

Module Content:  The module covers the key political, military, economic, cultural and environmental events and developments in Scotland of the late 13th and 14th centuries, set within a wider British Isles and European context. It includes the causes and courses of the 'Wars of Independence' or 'Succession' and such allied themes as the development of identity, kingship, lordship, representative assembly, church and faith, ceremonial and environmental crises, as well as of the complexity and paucity of primary source material for the period and controversies arising from their scholarly interpretation.

Learning Outcomes:  By the end of the module students will possess:
• An understanding of the complexity, diversity and problematic nature of late thirteenth and early fourteenth century Scotland in a wider British Isles and European context, during a severe crisis in kingship and environment, resulting in both a half century of general war against England and a civil war over Scottish leadership: this will include questions relating to the nature of medieval Scottish government and national identity.
• A capacity to identify and to critically evaluate a range of relevant contemporary sources and material culture.
• A capacity to identify and critically evaluate conflicting historical interpretations.
• The ability to present their research findings effectively in both discursive, evidence-based written and oral (audio-visual) communication.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9.  Not available to students who have taken HIS99Q.

Module Literature:  All students should purchase copies of:

  • G.W.S. Barrow's Robert Bruce and the Community of the Realm of Scotland , 3rd Edition (1988).
  • M. Brown, The Wars of Scotland , 1214-1371 (2004).
  • M.A. Penman, Robert the Bruce, King of the Scots (2014)
  • DVD - A History of Scotland (BBC Scotland, 2006 - presented by Neil Oliver) - episodes 3 and 4.

Module Structure:  Weekly one-hour LECTURES will provide a chronological spine for the historical events studied on the module as well as an introduction to the interpretive and historiographical debates which have resulted from their critical analysis: the latter will be structured around the key conceptual themes underpinning the module such as identity, kingship, lordship, government, parliament, patronage, religion, culture, environment etc. and will often involve detailed reference to key contemporary primary sources. The lectures will also provide visual material relevant to the module in terms of maps, archaeology, heritage sites and material culture. Weekly one-hour TUTORIALS will reinforce and explore the factual knowledge, chronology, historiographical awareness and primary evidence critical analysis introduced in the lectures and expanded upon by independent student study. Activities during and between tutorials will include assigned specialist (primary source and secondary) reading, reportage and solo presentations, group work and debates and direct primary source analysis: these activities will ideally deepen and focus the learning experience and critical reflection begun with the lectures and developed through independent study. INDEPENDENT STUDY will usually begin with secondary overview scholarship but advance quickly to specialist reading of journal articles, essays, reports, source commentaries and monographs, enabling students to conceptualise, problematise, analyse, reinterpret and discuss the key events, personalities, primary sources, disciplinary approaches, methodologies and academic/professional historiographical and popular culture debates relevant to the period under study. FEEDBACK/FORWARD SESSIONS will allow students to discuss their individual approaches to assessments and tutorial preparation in general on a 1:1 basis, including critical selection of reading, primary evidence, library search skills, historiographical awareness, workload planning and essay/review structuring and writing, and constructive reflection on completed work (both written and oral).

Assessment:  The grade is based on one essay of 2500 words (40%), one two hour exam (50%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9S4 Union, Rebellion and 'ages' new: Scotland 1707 to c.1830

The module is likely to include coverage of the major political, religious, social and economic features of the period, including the Union of 1707, the Jacobite movement, the Enlightenment, demographic change and the role of the state church. The aim of the module is to analyse the changes in Scottish society in the period following the accession of William and Mary and subsequent political union with England in 1707.  It seeks to deepen history-specific skills already acquired and to help extend further a range of transferable skills.

Pre-requisite:  Two History modules at level 8.

Module Literature:

  • T.M. Devine, The Scottish Nation, 1700-2000 (1999).
  • T.M. Devine and R. Mitchison (eds), People and Society in Scotland .  Vol. 1, c.1760-1832 (1988).
  • W. Ferguson , Scotland 1689 to the Present (1968).
  • B.P. Lenman, Integration and Enlightenment.  Scotland 1746-1832 (1981).
  • B.P. Lenman and J.S. Gibson (eds), The Jacobite Threat (1990).

Module Structure:

The module is taught through a lecture and a one-hour tutorial per week.  Attendance at tutorials is compulsory.  All tutorials are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.  Preparation for tutorials is essential and individual reading assignments will be allocated.  Topics for discussion will include the accession of William and Mary, the Union of 1707 and its impact, the Jacobite movement, the Enlightenment, agricultural improvement, religion and demographic change.  Most tutorials will involve the use of primary source materials.  Lectures will be thematic, and will cover political developments, the Union , Jacobitism, religious dissent and changes, economic and social change, the Enlightenment, education, medicine, industrialisation and demographic change.

Assessment: 

The grade is based on an essay of 2500 words (40%), a two-hour examination (50%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9X4: Back to the Future: putting history and heritage to work

The module will consider how the study of the past is put to work in various aspects of the economy and society. It will be structured around various spheres of activity and areas of employment, which will be relevant to students in other programmes, including: archaeology and conservation, local government/planning and heritage. As an employability/graduate attribute module, it will also offer students engaged in the study of the past the opportunity to address the relevance of their degrees to a number of professional sectors and to reflect on their career development.

The aim is to deliver a unique Employability/Graduate Attribute module at pre-Honours level (semester 4). It is intended to be a core module for the History and Scottish History single honours students, bringing employability and career development into the curriculum at the pre-Honours level. It will also serve as a core module for the integrated Heritage and Tourism BA students. For the Heritage and Tourism students it will enhance employability skills, but also improve the transition from Forth Valley College to the University education environment. These students enter the University full time for their Honours level programme in semester 5, but we aim to support the ‘learner journey’ by providing one University-taught semester 4 module. The Programme Director for the BA in Heritage and Tourism will play a significant role in the co-ordination and/or delivery of the module, further integrating the teaching across the programmes and providing the opportunity to build strong relationships with the integrated degree students.

Module Literature: 

  • D. Lowenthal, The Heritage Crusade and the Spoils of History (2011);
  • The History and Heritage Handbook 2016-17; D. Cannadine ed.,
  • History and the Media (2007); S. Dichfield et al eds.,
  • History and Heritage: Consuming the Past in Contemporary Culture (1998); C. Forrest,
  • International Law and the Protection of Cultural Heritage (2011); A. Czechi,
  • The Settlement of International Cultural Heritage Disputes  (2014).

Module Structure: 

The module will be delivered through 10 weekly 1-hour lectures (some of which may be supported by podcasts, external speakers, documentaries (including Succeed) and/or films). These will be particularly important for the delivery of the knowledge learning outcomes. There will also be up to 5 additional 1-hour sessions involving presentations from people working in particular sectors, with Q&A sessions at the end for students. The module will also involve 10 weekly 1-hour seminars, where students will be actively engaged in discussion based on directed readings and other preparatory assignments. Whilst supporting acquisition of knowledge and understanding, the seminars will be particularly important for the development of intellectual skills and for delivery of formative feedback.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

 

Assessment: 

Assessment 1 - c.1,500 word critical review of the use of history or heritage in a specific drama, documentary, or exhibition. This will be worth 40% of the overall mark.
Assessment 2 – Illustrated Poster Presentation (using PowerPoint or other suitable software), analysing a pathway into a particular sector or sector-specific role. Students will be expected to identify how the knowledge, understanding and skills gained from their degree can be applied to entry into the sector or sector-specific role. This will be worth 10% of the overall mark

Assessment 3 – c.1,500 word employability development plan and attached CV. The plan will identity curricular and extra-curricular activities, which will support the acquisition of knowledge, understanding and skills relevant to a specific sector. It will also require students to indicate how they might evidence capacity in these areas. This will be worth 40% of the overall mark.

Assessment 4 – oral contribution – 10%

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