HISU921: The Making of Modern Britain, 1707 to 2000: An introduction

The module includes the following topics: Britian after Union, Jacobitism, the first British Empire and revolution, economy and the Enlightenment, political development and party, feminisms, environment, health and social policy and progress, the second British Empire and, war and society and Britain in Europe. This introductory module aims to provide students with a knowledge and understanding of continuity and change in British history in the period 1707-2000, as well as of a variety of approaches to the past and the interconnections between them.  It seeks to deepen history-specific intellectual skills already acquired or to assist those studying history as a discipline for the first time in acquiring such skills.  It also helps to foster a range of transferable skills. The module is taught through two lectures and a one-hour tutorial per week. Attendance at tutorials is required. All tutorials are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them. Preparation is essential in order to facilitate discussion of the topics covered in the lecture at a deeper level and to allow the development of historical skills.

Pre-requisite: None.

Module Literature:

Module Guide for HISU921: The Making of Modern Britain: An Introduction

HISU921 Primary Source Handbook

Faculty of History and Politics Academic Skills booklet (ASB)

Students will also need to familiarise themselves with J. Vernon, Distant Strangers: How Britain Became Modern (London, 2014).

Module Structure:

The module is taught through two lectures and a one-hour tutorial per week. Attendance at tutorials is compulsory. All tutorials are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them. Preparation is essential in order to facilitate discussion of the topics covered in the lecture at a deeper level and to allow the development of historical skills.

Assessment:

Assessment consists of an academic history essay of 1000 words (40%) which tests the capacity to discern the essential case being made by an historian in an article and to evaluate it on the grounds of evidence, context, coverage and argument; a second, full History essay of 2000 words (50%) which tests the ability to argue persuasively, to carry out independent work, research and located sources, manage time and write with organisation and clarity; oral contribution to seminars (10%) based on participation in class discussion and the depth of knowledge, coherence of argument and clarity of communication.

This module is an alternative to HISU9S1: Kingship and Nationhood: Scotland, c.1100-1513

Note: Modules HISU921 and HISU9S1 are mutually exclusive.

HISU9S1: Scotland in pre-modern Europe: An introduction

The module includes the following topics: the origins of the Kingdom, feudal Scotland, the medieval Church and the Reformation in Scotland and Europe, the Wars of Independence, the economy, environment and society, the Highlands, witchcraft, the early and later Stewart kings, medieval culture and the Renaissance, Mary Queen of Scots, the Union of 1603, the civil wars and revolutions of the seventeenth century, Restoration politics and the 1707 Union of the Parliaments. This introductory module aims to provide students with a knowledge and understanding of continuity and change in Scottish history in the period c.1100-1707, as well as of the variety of approaches to the past and the interconnections between them. It seeks to deepen history-specific intellectual skills already acquired or to assist those studying history as a discipline for the first time in acquiring such skills. It also helps foster a range of transferable skills. The module is taught through two lectures and a one-hour tutorial per week. Attendance at tutorials is required. All tutorials are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them. Preparation is essential in order to facilitate discussion of the topics covered in the lecture at a deeper level and to allow the development of historical skills

Pre-requisite:  None.

Module Literature:

  • A.D.M. Barrell, Medieval Scotland (Cambridge, 2001).
  • K. Brown, Kingdom or Province? Scotland and the Regal Union, 1603-1715 (London, 1993).
  • G. Donaldson, James V-James VII (Edinburgh, 1990).
  • R.A. Houston and W. Knox eds., The New Penguin History of Scotland (2001)
  • M. Lynch, Scotland: A New History (Edinburgh, 1989).
  • R. Nicholson, Scotland, The Later Middle Ages (Edinburgh, 1978).
  • R.D. Oram (ed.), The Kings and Queens of Scotland (Stroud, 2004).
  • B. Webster, Medieval Scotland: The Making of an Identity (London, 1997)
  • J. Wormald, (ed.), Scotland: A History (Oxford, 2005).

Module Structure:  

The module is taught through two lectures and a one-hour tutorial per week.  Attendance at tutorials is compulsory. All tutorials are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.  Preparation is essential in order to facilitate discussion of the topics covered in the lecture at a deeper level and to allow the development of historical skills.

Assessment:

Assessment consists of a secondary source review essay of 1,000 words (40%) which allows students to discern the essential case being made by an historian in an article and to evaluate it on the grounds of evidence, context and persuasion; a second full History essay of 2,000 words (50%) which tests the ability to argue persuasively, carry out independent work, research sources, manage time and write with organisation and clarity; oral contribution, based on discussion and attendance (10%).

This module is an alternative to HISU921: People, Politics and Empire:  Britain, 1780-1914

Note:  Modules HISU921 and HISU9S1 are mutually exclusive.

HISU9S3: Reputations in History

(Image: John Brown)

This module will focus upon the historical reputations of a number of important figures from Europe, America, Africa, Britain and Scotland, from the medieval period to the twenty-first century. As well as locating these figures in the context of their own times, the module will also assess the significance attached to their lives through the differing interpretations of scholars in different periods. The module will, therefore, contribute to an understanding of the construction of reputation, the use of varied documentary and electronic sources and a sense of past individual, national and cultural identities. The module aims to provide students with an understanding of the formation of reputations over time and the history and nature of various national identities over a lengthy period. This will be achieved through an appreciation of the lives of significant individuals and of the role played by historiography in sustaining, validating and questioning the reputations of historical figures. It seeks to deepen history-specific skills already acquired and to help extend further a range of transferable skills.

In the course of taking this module students are expected to gain an understanding of the secondary literature and representative sources for reputations studies. It is the third part of the Pathways to History at level 8, where students are given a grounding in historical approaches and methodologies. The module also builds on the primary source focus in semester 2. The historical figures covered are from a very wide chronology from the medieval period to the twentieth century and consist of Scottish, British and international individuals. The major subjects studied include:
• William Wallace
• John Knox
• Mary, Queen of Scots
• John Adams
• King George III
• Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole
• Karl Marx
• David Livingstone
• John Maclean
• John Muir
• Nelson Mandela

Pre-requisite: One history module at level 8.

Module literature:

The basis of reputation studies is that all sources have some relevance, from academic works to tabloid newspapers. However, to give insights into reputation studies, the figures to be considered in this module and their life and times you may wish to look at one or more of the following:

David Livingstone: Livingstone, Justin D., Livingstone’s “Lives”:  A Metabiography of a Victorian Icon (Manchester, online, 2015)
Karl Marx: Sperber, J., Karl Marx: a nineteenth-century life (London: Knopf, 2013)
Nelson Mandela:  Boehmer, Elleke, Nelson Mandela: a very short introduction  (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2008).
 John Knox: Donaldson, Gordon, James V-James VII (1987), (chapter 6)
 King George III: O’Gorman, Frank, The long eighteenth century: British political and social history 1688-1832 (1997)
 Florence Nightingale and Mary Seacole: Bostridge, Mark, Florence Nightingale: the woman and her legend (2009)
 William Wallace: Morton, Graham, William Wallace: Man or Myth (2001), (chapter 1)
John Maclean: Hutchison, I.G.C., A Political History of Scotland 1832-1924: Parties, Elections, and Issues (Edinburgh: John Donald, 1986 & 2003), (chapter 9)

Module Structure:

The module is taught through two lectures and a one-hour tutorial per week. Attendance at tutorials is prescribed since students are assessed for their oral performance at them. Preparation is essential in order to facilitate discussion of the topics covered in the lectures at a deeper level and to allow the development of historical skills. Performance is not assessed on 'correctness' but on a willingness to present and develop an argument.

Assessment: 

Assessment consists of a document exercise essay of 1,500 words (40%) which allows students to analyse the documents provided for a figure in the light of a set question; a second full History essay of 2,000 words (50%) which tests the ability to argue persuasively, carry out independent work, research sources, manage time and write with organisation and clarity and an oral contribution, based on discussion and attendance (10%).

HISU9X2 Concepts of History: Themes and Transformations

Module content: This module will provide students with an early engagement with some of the key thematic concepts of History which they will encounter in later modules and in their own independent studies.  Tutorials and lecture themes may include gender, race revolutions, urban and rural transformation, environment, conflict and empire. The module is followed in semester 3 by the module Reputations in History, which provides another thematicfoundation before we break out into more specialised geographical and chronological studies from semester 4 onwards.

By the end of this course students should be able to:
Compare and contrast important themes in world history from the medieval period to the present day
Classify issues of gender, race, class, rebellion, revolution, industrialisation, urban and rural transformation, health and social welfare and the environment.
Compare and contrast a selection of relevant contemporary sources.
Evaluate conflicting historical interpretations.

Pre-requisite:  None.

Module Literature:

R. M. Burns and H. Rayment-Pickard, Philosophies of History (Oxford, 2000)
E H. Carr, What is History? (Basingstoke, 2001)
G. R. Elton, The Practice of History (Oxford, 2002)
R. J. Evans, In Defence of History (London, 1997)
B. C. Fay et al. (ed.), History and Theory: Contemporary Readings (Malden, MA, 1998)
P. Gardiner (ed.), Theories of History (New York, London, c1959)
L. Jordanova, History in Practice (London, 2000)
A. Marwick, The Nature of History (Basingstoke, 1989)
J. Tosh, The Pursuit of History (London, 2002)
J. Tosh, Historians on History (Harlow, 2000)Module Structure:  

The module is taught through two lectures and a one-hour tutorial per week.  Attendance at tutorials is compulsory.  All tutorials are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.  Preparation is essential in order to facilitate discussion of the topics covered in the lecture at a deeper level and to allow the development of historical skills. Performance is not assessed on ‘correctness’ but on a willingness to present and develop an argument.

Assessment: 

Assessment consists of a critical review essay (2,000 words) worth 40%, which allows students to analyse primary source documents provided; an examination (2 hours) worth 50%, consisting of two primary source documents to be analysed in two hours, testing the ability, under time pressure and time management, to evaluate documents, think critically, and write with clarity and organisation; and an oral contribution  10% (averaged over module) based on discussion and attendance.

Coursework 50% 

Examination 50%

Practical 0%

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