HISU9B5: Interwar Europe - Communism, Fascism and Democracy, 1914-1945

Module Content:  This module forms a natural complement to HISU9B4 (Europe in the Long Nineteenth Century, 1789-1918).  The main emphasis is on the crucial interwar period.  Considerable attention is directed towards the weakness of democratic, parliamentary government in major European countries and the concomitant challenge posed by Fascism, National Socialism and Communism.  Hence, Fascist Italy, Weimar and Nazi Germany and Bolshevik/Stalinist Russia figure prominently, supplemented by assessments of the Popular Front era in France and Spain and, to a lesser extent, of conditions in Central and Eastern Europe .  The resultant strains on international diplomacy, particularly during the 1930s, are also fully analysed.

Learning Outcomes:  This module aims to provide the student with a strong understanding of the social and ideological tensions the Europeans faced and the political alternatives they embraced between 1914 and 1945.  The module combines a thematic and a chronological approach, beginning with an analysis of the social and political effects of the Great War, the concomitant victory of communism in Russia and the triumph of Mussolini’s fascism in Italy. Then the module analyses the trials and tribulations of democracy in a selection of European countries, including the republican experiments in Germany and Spain and the tensions introduced by the wide social acceptance of authoritarian alternatives. The third part of the module is dedicated to analysing the triumph of Hitler and the Nazis, the rise of anti-fascism and the international building up of tensions which led to the Second World War, with a special emphasis on the Spanish Civil War. The Second World War itself is analysed with a special focus in the clash of ideologies, the different instances of collaboration and resistance and the projects and practices of empire building, ethnic cleansing and genocide. A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9.   

Module Literature:  The following is a selection of recommended general texts which serve as an introduction to the module:

  • Hobsbawm, E.J. Age of extremes: the short twentieth century, 1914-1991 (London, 1995).
  • Jackson J., Europe, 1900-1945 (Oxford, 2002).
  • Kershaw, Ian, To hell and back: Europe, 1914-1949 (London, 2015).
  • Mazower,M. Dark continent: Europe's twentieth century (London, 1998).
  • Steiner, Z. The lights that failed: European international history, 1919-1933 (Oxford, 2005).
  • Tooze, J. Adam, The deluge: the Great War and the remaking of global order, 1916-1931 (London, 2014).
  • Traverso, Enzo, Fire and blood : the European civil war 1914-1945 (London, 2016).

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  The module is taught through a series of two-hour weekly seminars. Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment:  The grade is based on one essay of 2500 words (60%), one 'critical review' of a secondary source of 1500 words (30%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9D5: The United States since 1890

Module Content:  The module provides students with an understanding of some of the main trends and developments in United States history during the twentieth century, with a focus on the 1930s to 2008: 

1. Introduction: The U.S. in the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era
2. The Great Depression and The New Deal
3. The US And World War Two
4. The Cold War
5. The Civil Rights Movement
6. National Issues and People: The Cuban Missile Crisis, Oct. 1962
7. The US and Vietnam
8. The Sixties
9. “Coming Apart?”: US Politics, 1968-1974
10. The Resurgence of Domestic Conservatism
11. The US and the Wider World
The impact of 9/11 on US Foreign Policy

Learning Outcomes:  By the end of this course students should be able to:

• Possess an understanding of two major historical themes in 20th century U.S. history: the United States of America’s relationship with the wider world in war and peace during the twentieth century, and U.S. political and domestic history.
• Assess critically a professional scholarly article in the relevant historiography
• Evaluate conflicting historical interpretations.
• Show a capacity to collect evidence to test or support historical cases in writing and in oral presentation
• Locate source material and critically evaluate historical documents.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9.

Module Literature: 

  • Tindall, G.B. and D.E. Shi, America: A Narrative History. W.W. Norton paperback, Brief 8th or 9th edition. Badger, Anthony J. The New Deal: The Depression Years, 1933-1940. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1989.
  • Hook, Steven W. American Foreign Policy since World War II. 17th ed. Washington, DC: CQ Press, 2007.
  • LaFeber, Walter. The American Age: United States Foreign Policy at Home and Abroad. Vol. 2: Since 1896. 2nd ed. New York, NY: W. W. Norton, 1994.
  • McMahon, Robert J., ed. Major Problems in the History of the Vietnam War: Documents and Essays. 2nd ed. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath, 1995.
  • Miller, Douglas T. On Our Own: Americans in the Sixties. Lexington, MA: D. C. Heath, 1996.
  • Heale, M. J. The Sixties in America: History, Politics and Protest. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University, 2001.
  • White, John. Black Leadership in America: from Booker T. Washington to Jesse Jackson. 2nd. ed. London: Longman, 1990.

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  The module is taught through a series of two-hour weekly seminars. Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment:  The grade is based on one essay of 2500 words (60%), one 'critical review' of a secondary source of 1500 words (30%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9E5: Africa in the Twentieth Century

Module Content: This module focuses on the key themes in twentieth century African political and socio-economic history. It deals with three broad themes, namely colonial Africa, decolonisation and Africa in the independent era.

The political and socio-economic history of Africa in the twentieth century is explored from an African-centred viewpoint by focusing on key themes of colonial rule, the decolonisation process and independent Africa. Specific issues address in the colonial era include the economic and political impact of colonial rule, the creation of peasant, white settler and mining economies, and African resistance to colonial rule. The decolonisation process explores the emergence of diverse forms of African nationalism, how these nationalists in turn agitated for independence from European rule, and the stark differences between decolonisation processes in so-called white settler colonies and those in the rest of colonial Africa. The last section focuses on independent Africa and explores politics, conflict and economics in independent Africa. Case studies for each individual seminar group differ on a weekly basis and these are drawn from North Africa (Algeria), West Africa (Ghana, Nigeria and French West Africa), Central Africa (British Central Africa, Malawi and Rwanda), Southern Africa (Angola, South Africa and Zimbabwe), and East Africa (Tanzania, Uganda, Kenya, the Sudan and Ethiopia).

Learning Outcomes:By the end of this course the students should be able to:

  • Demonstrate a critical understanding of the socio-economic, political, environmental and religious complexity, diversity and histories of modern African societies.
  • Be able to select and present the most important arguments in a variety of historical sources on Africa in the twentieth century.
  • Contextualise African developments in the course of the twentieth century within global developments during the same period.
  • Excercise autonomy of thought in determining the impact of colonial rule on independent African states.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9.  

Module Literature:  

  • P. Nugent, Africa since independence: a comparative history (Bsingstoke: PalgraveMacmillan, 2004).
  • R. J. Reid, A history of modern Africa: 1800 to the present (Chichester: Wiley Blackwell, 2009).
  • B. Freund, The making of contemporary Africa: the development of African society since 1800 (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1998).
  • J. F. Munro, Africa and the international economy 1800-1960: an introduction to the modern economic history of Africa south of the Sahara (London: Dent, 1976).
  • R. Austen, African enconomic history: internal development and external dependency (London: James Currey, 1987)
  • O. Furley (ed.), Conflict in Africa (London: I. B. Tauris, 1995)

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  The module is taught through a series of two-hour weekly seminars. Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment:  The grade is based on one essay of 2500 words (50%), one 1500 word essay (30%) and oral work (20%).

HISU9F5: Gender in Britain, 1750-1930

Module Content:  TThis module provides students with a knowledge and understanding of continuity and change in British gender history in the period 1750-1930. It compares the social realities of life for women and men in Britain with the two dominant gender ideologies of this period in order to assess how far these ideas were actually practised in society and how far they were largely rhetoric. It helps to explain how some crucial ideas about gender in modern Britain have arisen.

Learning Outcomes:  By the end of this module students should be able to:
1. Criticise assumptions made about the extent to which a dominant set of ideas about gender was practised in reality, 1750-1930
2. Assess the extent to which men and women were each active in promoting feminist and anti-feminist ideas in that period
3. Evaluate social practices in that period in the context of beliefs about ideal gender roles 
4. Assess critically a professional scholarly article in this historiography
5. Read critically extended pieces of contemporary writing on gender roles in British society.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9.

Module Literature:

Primary source set texts:

  • Mary Wollstonecraft, A Vindication of the Rights of Woman (1792; Penguin edition, 2004);
  • John Stuart Mill, On Liberty and The Subjection of Women (1869; Penguin edition, 2006);
  • S. Hamilton (ed.), 'Criminals, Idiots, Women and Minors': Nineteenth-Century Writing by Women on Women (Broadview Press, Ltd, Canada,1995; or second edition, 2004).

Useful introductory secondary literature:

  • L. Davidoff & C. Hall, Family Fortunes: men and women of the English middle classes, 1780-1850 (1987 and multiple further editions);
  • R.B. Shoemaker, Gender in English Society, 1650-1850 (1998);
  • K. Gleadle, British Women in the Nineteenth Century (2001); B. Caine, English Feminism, 1780-1980 (1997);
  • J. Tosh, Manliness and Masculinities in Nineteenth-Century Britain: essays on gender, family and empire (2004).

Assessment:   The grade is based on one essay of 2500 words (60%), one 'critical review' of a secondary source of 1500 words (30%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9G5: Black People in Britain, 1750-1950

Module Content:  The module studies the experiences of black people in Britain over a two hundred year period from 1750. It looks at black people's experiences and white individual and government reactions to the black presence over time through contemporary records.

This module explores black people’s experience and white British reaction at both an individual and Government level in the time period 1750-1950.  Particular attention is paid to the 18th century black community; Pro-slavery and the origins of racist ideology; 19th century black Britons.

Learning Outcomes:By the end of this course students should be able to:

  • Evaluate the influences shaping modern day discourse on racism and diversity.
  • Evaluate contrasting past opinions on slavery
  • Judge the importance of racist outlooks in British imperial rule c.18-20th centuries
  • Criticise the work of racist writers in the period 1750-1950
  • Evaluate the role of key black political activists in Britain from 1750 to 1950

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9.

Module Literature:  

  • P. Fryer, Staying Power: The History of Black People in Britain (Pluto Press, first published 1984, latest edition 2014)
  • D. Dabydeen et al, The Oxford Companion to Black British History (Oxford University Press, 2008)
  • O. Equiano, The Interesting Narrative and Other Writings (Penguin, 1995)
  • Seacole, M., The Wonderful Adventures of Mrs Seacole in Many Lands, (Penguin, 2005)
  • J. Walvin, Black Ivory: A History of British Slavery (Fontana Press, 1993)

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  The module is taught through a series of two-hour weekly seminars (preparing occasional class papers) on topics covering the chronological and thematic range of the module: from late 18th century slavery down to the beginning of mass immigration after the Second World War.  Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment:  The grade is based one 'critical review' essays of 1500 words (30%), a second essay of 2500 words (60%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9L5: Religion, Politics and Society in 19th-Century Britain

Module Content:  The module examines the place of religion in nineteenth-century Scotland , England and Wales .  It considers the role of the Established Churches and of religious Dissenters, the impact of popular Evangelicalism on society at large, the distinctive features of the Presbyterian experience in Scotland, the growth of Roman Catholicism and the significance of hostility to Catholicism, the nature of Methodism and its attitude to radicalism, the geographical distribution of religious groups, the relation of churchgoing to social class and the place of women in religion.

Learning Outcomes:  The module aims to provide students with an understanding of the role of the churches in British society and politics during the nineteenth century.  It seeks to deepen history-specific skills already acquired and to help extend further a range of transferable skills.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9.  (This requirement may be waived for Honours Religious Studies students.)

Module Literature:  Useful introductory works:

  • D. W. Bebbington, Evangelicalism in Modern Britain :  a history from the 1730s to the 1980s, Unwin Hyman, 1989.  A paperback exploring the main religious tradition examined in the module.
  • H. McLeod, Religion and Society in England , 1850-1914, Macmillan, 1996.  Excellent survey.
  • C. G. Brown, The People in the Pews: religion and society in Scotland since 1780, Economic and Social History Society of Scotland, 1993.  A succinct and up-to-date overview.
  • B. I. Coleman, The Church of England in the Mid-Nineteenth Century, Historical Association, 1980.  A concise study concentrating on social geography, but out of print.
  • E. R. Norman, The English Catholic Church in the Nineteenth Century, Oxford University Press, 1984.  A valuable overview, but out of print.
  • D. Rosman, The Evolution of the English Churches, 1500-2000, Cambridge , 2003).  A clear and intelligible account.

Module Structure:  The module is taught by weekly seminars lasting two hours each. Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.  Topics covered in successive weeks are:  The Established Churches and Religious Dissent, Evangelicalism, Presbyterianism in Scotland , Catholics and Anti-Catholicism, Methodism and Radicalism, Geographical Distribution, Social Composition and Women in Religion.

Assessment:  The grade is based on one essay of 2500 words (50%), one 'critical review' of a secondary source of 1500 words (30%) and oral work (20%).

HISU9P5: Stewart Scotland I : 1406-88 - Kingship or Tyranny?

Module Content: This module is likely to include: fourteenth century political background; theories of kingship and lordship; the reign of James I 1406-36; the murder of James I, 1437; the minority of James II, 1437-50; James II v. the Black Douglases, 1450-60; the minority of James III, 1460-69; the tumultuous reign of James III, 1469-82; the demise of James III, 1482-88; Stewart court and culture; Scottish relations with England, France and the rest of Europe.

Learning Outcomes: The module aims to provide students with an understanding in depth of the changing nature of royal power in fifteenth-century Scotland by examining the key political crises and trends, diplomatic exchanges and wars and cultural events of the reigns of Jameses I, I and III. It seeks to deepen history-specific skills already acquired and to help extend further a range of transferable skills.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite: One History module at level 9.

Module Literature: (in appropriate order of approach):

  • A. Grant, Independence and Nationhood: Scotland , 1306-1460 (1984).
  • J. Wormald, Court, Kirk and Community: Scotland , 1470-1625 (1981).
  • M. Brown, James I (1984).
  • C. McGladdery, James II (1987).
  • N.A.T. Macdougall, James III – A Political Study (1982).
  • M. Brown, ' Scotland Tamed? – Kings and Magnates in Late Medieval Scotland – a Review of Recent Work', Innes Review, xlv (1994).

Module Structure: There are no formal lectures as such and the module is taught through a series of two-hour weekly seminars: however, the first seminar will include a short introductory lecture. Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential. All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them. Individual reading may be allocated for each seminar and primary material handouts will be distributed at least a week in advance. Students will be required to make one formal presentation of roughly 10 to 15 minutes on a question of their choice from the outlined seminar topics. Each student will also be expected to participate in a group presentation project undertaken and delivered in the last two weeks of the module. Otherwise students are expected to prepare for and contribute to each session. Visual material may be used, and there will be a field trip to Stirling Castle and perhaps other relevant local sites.

Assessment: The grade is based on one essay of 2500 words (50%), one 'critical review' of a secondary source of 1500 words (30%) and oral work (20%).

HISU9S5: Nineteenth Century Scotland, c.1800-1914

Module Content:  The module aims to provide students with an understanding of central aspects of the history of Scotland over the long nineteenth century. In particular the module examines the economic transformation of Scotland in this period, and charts the social changes which ensued.  The consequences in the political, educational and religious spheres are looked at, as are the changes in popular culture, the role of women and the reconfiguration of national identity.

Learning Outcomes:  In the course of taking this module students are expected to gain understanding of the principal economic, political and social developments in Scotland in the period and of the inter-relationships between these. Themes covered include:
• Scotland and the Industrial Revolution
• Causes of poverty and the treatment of the poor
• The Highland economy in the nineteenth century
• The Scottish education system
• The role and influence of religion
• Irish migration into and impact upon Scotland.
• Scottish Housing
• Scottish Industry after the ‘second’ industrial revolution
• Scottish Politics

By the end of this course students should be able to:
• Display an awareness of the mechanisms of change and continuity in the history of nineteenth-century Scotland
• Assess critically a professional scholarly article in the relevant historiography
• Evaluate conflicting historical interpretations
• Show a capacity to collect evidence to test or support historical cases
• Locate source material and critically evaluate historical documents.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9. 

Module Literature:  There are no prescribed textbooks for this module.  It is, however, recommended that some or all of the following be purchased:

  • T. C. Smout, A Century of the Scottish People, 1830-1950 (1986).
  • R. H. Campbell, Scotland since 1707 (1986).
  • A. Cooke, I. Donnachie, A. MacSween & C.A. Whatley, Modern Scottish History, 1707 to the Present, vol. 2, The Modernisation of Scotland, 1850 to the Present (1998).
  • T.M. Devine, The Scottish Nation 1700-2000 (1999).
  • W. Fraser & R. Morris, People and Society in Scotland .  Vol. II, 1830-1914 (1990).
  • J.F. McCaffrey , Scotland in the Nineteenth Century (1998).

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  The module is taught through a series of two-hour weekly seminars. Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

 Assessment:  The grade is based on one essay of 2500 words (60%), one 'critical review' of a secondary source of 1500 words (30%) and oral work (10%).

ARTU9C6 History of Political Thought

Module Content:  This module examines the political thought of the western world from the eighteenth to the twentieth centuries with particular attention to the main thinkers whose ideas have impinged on Britain . The central issue addressed is the question of why the theorists adopted their views on politics, and so considers the intellectual and personal influences operating upon them. The thinkers fall into three groups: Burke, Bentham and Mill; Rousseau, Hegel and Marx; and T.H. Green, R.H. Tawney and Michael Oakeshott.

The philosophical premises, as well as the political teachings of each theorist, are examined. Among the influences that may have affected them, consideration is given to previous thinkers, not necessarily specialists in politics; to the background of the theorists, including their nation, class, religion and profession; to their personal experiences, in their formation and in their relationships; to the events during their lives, especially momentous happenings such as wars and revolutions; and to the personal perceptions that injected original elements into their thought.

Learning Outcomes:  The module aims to provide students with an understanding of the history of western political thought between the mid-eighteenth century and the present day.  It seeks to deepen history-specific skills already acquired and to help extend further a range of transferable skills.

By the end of the module, students should be able to:
Possess an awareness of the origins of modern political values and ideas
Evaluate the various influences moulding modern political thinkers
Support their analyses with appropriate evidence
Relate political thought to contemporary circumstances, public and private
Recognise the relationship between traditions of thought in the history of ideas.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Prerequisite:  One History module at level 9 or 10 or POL9PG.

Module Literature:

  • I. Hampsher-Monk, A History of Modern Political Thought: major political thinkers from Hobbes to Marx, 1992.
  • I. Berlin , Two Concepts of Liberty, 1958 (reprinted in Four Essays in Liberty, 1969).
  • E. Burke, Reflections on the Revolution in France , ed. C. C. O'Brien, 1968.

Module Structure:  Students will attend weekly seminars lasting three hours, the first two spent in discussing a political theorist and the last one consisting of a lecture by the tutor on the same theorist. All attendees are required to read an extract from the theorist and an additional item of reading about him in advance. Each week the discussion will be opened by one or more student presentations lasting five minutes each.  In addition, students may attend scheduled feedback and feedforward sessions. Students will use the independent study hours to prepare for seminars, essays and examinations. 
The presentations, discussion, lectures and preparation are designed to familiarise students with the issues surrounding interpretations of the thought of each political theorist.

Assessment: The grade is based on an essay of 2500 words (45%), a two-hour examination (45%) and oral work (10%).

ARTU9H6 Safer spaces: Environment in 20th Century Britain

Module overview :  This module will take you on a thematic journey from the atmosphere, to the mountain top, down through forestry, heath and moor to agricultural land, into green belt suburbia and the urban environment, and from river through to estuary and out to sea. By using a wide variety of focused case studies set within a wider European and international context, the module will explore the use, abuse and protection of the natural and built environment in 20th century Britain.

Topics include: module introduction;  what is environmental history? the history of clean air, covering drivers of reform/regulation and smokeless zones; the history of safe water, covering supply, pollution, regulation and flooding, a green and pleasant land? covering the legacies of rural industrialisation, edgelands and the mining imaginary debate, coal mining legacies of dereliction and subsequent  reclamation, the history of urbanisation and associated problems; Towards a Green and Pleasant Land, covering urban planning: 1947 Town and Country Planning Act, new towns and green belt, National Parks; the developmental history of protection and conservation groups;  1970 year of conservation, the history and drivers of new environmentalism and environmental protection.

Learning outcomes:  By the end of this module students should possess the ability to:
• Evaluate the environmental and health impacts of human activities, including major environmental disasters,  in a variety of settings, across differing locations
• Judge the historical socio-economic, cultural, political, medical, ecological and  environmental tensions that informed early conservation and environmental protection policy through to the emergence of early environmentalism and the green lobby
• Assess twentieth-century planning policy, such as the Town and Country Planning Acts, New Towns, Green Belt and National Parks and  environmental protection including the regulation of air, water and land and notions of sustainability  
• Demonstrate the relevance of historical research to current environmental/health policy debates
• Apply different methods and approaches in environmental history, recognising both the value of interdisciplinary study and the importance of ‘policy relevance’ to historical research.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite: One History module at level 9 or 10.

Module Structure: The module is taught through a series of two-hour seminars per week. Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential. All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: The grade is based on the production of an academic poster (45%), a two-hour examination (45%) and oral work (10%).

Preliminary reading:

I. G. Simmons, An Environmental History of Great Britain from 10,000 Years Ago to the Present  (Edinburgh, 2001)

J. R. McNeil, Something New Under the Sun: An Environmental History of the Twentieth Century World(London, 2002)

B. W. Clapp, An Environmental History of Britain since the Industrial Revolution (London, 1994)

A. Goudie, The Human Impact on the Natural Environment (Oxford, 2006) (although not a history text it is a good book to ‘dip into').

ARTU9K6 From World War to Cold: Europe 1944-1989/90

Module Content:   This module offers a wide-ranging survey of the social history of Western Europe since the end of the second World to the end of the Cold War, thus acquainting students with a key period of the most recent past and the challenges with analysing material that belongs to both cultural memory and history.

As a natural sequel that deepens and broadens the material covered in the semester 5 module on European history, this module has the following objectives:

  • an understanding of the key events and developments from the end of the Second World War in Europe to the end of the Cold War, with particular emphasis on how the experiences and memories of violence shaped political cultures and societies in Europe after 1945
  • an engagement with the diversity and multiplicity of European history and memory
  • development of students' history-specific research, analytical and discursive skills, especially with regard to concepts such as ‘cultural memory’
  • development of students' transferable analytical, communication and inter-personal skills
  • identification of topics and approaches for further study either as a final year undergraduate dissertation or for post-graduate study.

Learning Outcomes: 

This module also has the specific objective of providing students with the inter-disciplinary experience of evaluating and integrating a wide range of sources. It is of special interest to Politics students.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout which can be obtained from the module tutor.

By the end of this course, students should be able to:

  • Critically evaluate key events, processes and developments from the end of the Second World War in Europe to the end of the Cold War, with particular emphasis on how the experiences and memories of violence shaped political cultures and societies in Europe after 1945
  • Analytically engage with both the unity and diversity of European history and memory
  • Have developed higher-level  research, analytical and discursive skills
  • Have developed transferable analytical, communication and inter-personal skills, especially the ability to process large amounts of information and present them in a cogent and coherent arguments orally and in writing.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9 or 10.

Module Literature: 

  • Tom Buchanan, Europe's Troubled Peace, 1945 to the present (Oxford: Blackwell, 2012).
  • Geoff Eley, Forging Democracy. The History of the Left in Europe, 1850-2000 (Oxford: OUP, 2002).
  • Tony Judt, Postwar. A History of Europe since 1945 (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 2012).
  • Mark Mazower, Dark Continent. Europe's Twentieth Century (Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1999).

Module Structure:  The module is taught through a series of two-hour seminars per week.  Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: The grade is based on one Critical Review of 1500 words (30%), an essay of 2500 words (60%) and oral contribution (10%).

HISU9F6:Protests, Riots & Propaganda:Popular Politics in 18th Century Britain

Module Content:  This module provides students with an understanding of popular politics in Britain between the Glorious Revolution of 1688-89 and the French Revolutionary Wars up to the Peace of Amiens in 1802. It interrogates the popular characterisation of the eighteenth century as the age of oligarchy, and evaluates the power of 'the voice of the people' as against that of the political elite in Britain in that period. It helps to explain the origins of some crucial ideas about civil liberties in Britain. 

Learning Outcomes:  By the end of this module students should be able to:
1. Judge the efficacy of a range of popular protests in eighteenth-century Britain.
2. Judge the stability of the system of government in eighteenth-century Britain.
3. Evaluate the accuracy of the popular modern characterisation of the eighteenth century in Britain as the age of oligarchy.
4. Recognise and assess critically various schools of thought in the relevant historiography.
5. Read critically a range of genres of eighteenth-century political propaganda, including graphic satire and extended pieces of writing.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9 or 10.

Module Literature:  Useful introductory secondary literature includes:

  • H.T. Dickinson, The Politics of the People in Eighteenth-Century Britain (1995);
  • H.T. Dickinson (ed.), A Companion to Eighteenth-Century Britain (Oxford, 2002);
  • Frank O’Gorman, The Long Eighteenth Century: British Political and Social History 1688-1832 (London, 1997);
  • Kathleen Wilson, The Sense of the People: Politics, Culture and Imperialism in England, 1715-1785 (Cambridge, 1998);
  • C.A. Whatley, Scottish Society 1707-1830: Beyond Jacobitism, towards industrialisation (Manchester, 2000).

Module Structure:  The module is taught through a series of two-hour seminars per week.  Attendance at seminars is prescribed and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment:  The grade is based on an essay of 2500 words (45%), a two-hour examination (45%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9I6: Castles: Power and Authority, Landscapes and Contexts

Module Content:  Focusing mainly on the Scottish experience in the broader context of northern Europe, this module explores the castle, one of the iconic features of the Medieval and Early Modern landscape, in its wider cultural, social and economic roles, using the theories and methods of environmental history and landscape studies.  In it, the castle will not be studied as an isolated artefact, but in the direct context of its surrounding human and physical landscapes, exploring how they shaped it and how the castle’s owners reshaped and exploited them for their own purposes and needs.  The modules follows a thematic approach to examine a broad range of evidence types (archaeological, architectural, documentary and topographical) to trace the evolution of castles from the 11th to 17th centuries, explore the landscapes of power in which they stood, and assess their legacies in the environmental record. 

Learning Outcomes: By the end of this module students should be able to:

  • evaluate and criticise the problems and benefits of integrated multi- and interdisciplinary approaches to castle studies;
  • evaluate key contemporary debates over questions of functionalism or symbolism in castle-building;
  • offer critical judgement of spatial analysis methodologies in castle studies;
  • formulate, test and deconstruct environmental, historical and archaeological hypotheses relating to 'landscapes of lordship';
  • test and support historical models relating to castle-building and resource management.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9 or 10.  Students may find it advantageous to take module ENH2X2.

Module Literature:

  • CHigham, R and Barker, P, Timber Castles, 2nd edition (Exeter, 2004). 
  • Creighton, O H, Castles and Landscapes: Power, Community and Fortifications in Medieval England (London, 2005). 
  • Creighton, O H, Early European Castles: Aristocracy and Authority, AD 800-1200 (London, 2012).
  • Liddiard, R, Castles in Context: Power, Symbolism and Landscape, 1066-1500 (Macclesfield, 2005). 
  • Oram, R D (ed), A House Such as Thieves Might Knock At (Donington, 2015). 
  • Tabraham, C J, Scotland's Castles, 2nd edition (London, 2005).

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  The module is taught through a series of two-hour weekly seminars.  Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment:  The grade is based on an essay of 2500 words (45%), a two-hour examination (45%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9P6: Stewart Scotland II : 1488-1542 – The Glory of Princely Governing?

Module overview : This module will provide an understanding of the key events and developments of the historical period 1488-1542 in a Scottish/British Isles/European context.

Learning outcomes : Students will gain an understanding of the key political events of late-fifteenth and early sixteenth-century Scotland and of the changing nature of kingship, government, court and culture, baronial lordship and church/religion in the independent medieval kingdom as well as an understanding of the dynamics of international relations across late medieval and emerging Reformation Europe. In doing so, the module will focus on a growing body of recent primary source editions and secondary studies and engage with the local heritage resource of Stirling Castle (and other sites/museums), in particular the Great Hall of James IV (1488-1513) and the recently represented Palace of James V (1513-42).

By the end of the course students should possess:
• an understanding of the complexity, diversity and problematic nature of late fifteenth and early sixteenth century Scotland in a wider British Isles and European context, comparing and contrasting Scottish achievements in kingship, governance, diplomacy and war, religion and courtly display with those of contemporary Tudor England and Valois France.
• a capacity to identify and to critically evaluate a range of relevant contemporary sources and visual/material culture.
• a capacity to identify and critically evaluate conflicting historical interpretations.
• the ability to present  research findings effectively in both discursive, evidence-based written and oral (audio-visual) communication.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite: One History module at level 9 or 10.

Module Structure: The module is taught through a series of two-hour seminars per week. Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential. All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: The grade is based on an essay of 2500 words (45%), a two-hour examination (45%) and oral work (10%).

Preliminary reading:

  • J. Wormald, Court, Kirk and Community: Scotland 1470-1625 (1981)
  • J. Dawson, Scotland Reformed, 1488-1587 (2007)
  • N.A.T. Macdougall, James IV (2nd ed, 1997)
  • J. Cameron, James - The Personal Rule, 1528-42 (1998)
  • A. Thomas, Glory and Honour: Renaissance Scotland (2013)
HISU9S6 For God, King and Parliament: The Birth of Modern Europe, 1500-1700

Module Content: The module will include coverage of the major political, religious, social and economic features of the period, including the Renaissance, Reformation, political revolutions, absolutism and scientific revolution across Europe. The emphasis will be on Scotland in a European context but knowledge of Scottish history though useful is not necessary.

Learning Outcomes: The aim of the module is to assess Scotland and its European neighbours, especially England, Ireland, France, Spain, Sweden, and the Netherlands, during a period of turbulence and change. It seeks to deepen history-specific skills already acquired and to help extend further a range of transferable skills.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite: one History module at level 9 or 10.

Module Literature:  recommended texts are:

  • K.M. Brown, Kingdom or Province? Scotland and the Regal Union 1603-1707 (1992)
  • E. Cameron  (ed.), Early Modern Europe: an Oxford history (2001)
  • M. Wiesner-Hanks, Early Modern Europe 1450-1789 (2006)
  • G. Donaldson , Scotland , James V to James VII (1971).
  • H.G. Koenigsberge, Early Modern Europe, 1500-1789 (1987)
  • R. Mitchison, Lordship to Patronage. Scotland 1603-1746 (1983).

Purchase of some or all of these books is recommended.

Module Structure: There are no lectures. The module is taught through a series of two-hour weekly seminars, for which individual reading will be allocated. Attendance at seminars is vital and preparation essential. All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them. Topics for seminars will include: the end of medievalism; the European Renaissance and Scotland’s part in it; religious revolution in Europe, reformation and counter-reformation; the age of discovery and domination; princes versus parliaments; the Thirty Years War; the seventeenth-century ‘crisis’ in the British Isles and France; absolutism in Europe; Europe’s new age of ‘modern’ learning; British revolution and European war at the turn of the eighteenth century; the road to the Anglo- Scottish union in European context.

Assessment: The grade is based on an essay of 3000 words (45%), a two-hour examination (45%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9U6 Radicalism to Labourism: Popular Politics, 1800-1914

Module Content:  The module aims to provide students with an understanding of radical politics in Britain from the early industrial revolution to the beginning of the First World War; and to build on the historical skills and transferable skills promoted in earlier semester modules. Particular concern is paid to British political developments and how these impacted upon and were influenced by radicals, political movements and organisations.

Learning Outcomes:  In the course of taking this module students are expected to gain an understanding of the nature of political movements in Britain in the century before the First World War. Themes covered include:
• the ‘making’ of the working class
• early nineteenth century radicalism
• Owenism
• Chartism
• trade unionism
• women and the suffrage
• the formation of the Labour party

By the end of this course students should be able to:
• Display an understanding of working class or popular efforts both to challenge and secure representation within the Westminster parliament 
• Comprehend the history of political movements in the period
• Evaluate conflicting historical interpretations
• Show a capacity to collect evidence to test or support historical cases
• Locate source material and critically evaluate historical documents.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9 or 10.  Not available to students who have completed 69H4 or HIS99H.

Module Literature:  Recommended texts are:

  • Adelman, P.,  The Rise of the Labour Party 1880-1945.
  • Belchem, J., Popular Radicalism in Nineteenth Century Britain .
  • Belchem, J., Industrialisation and the Working Class, the English Experience 1750-1900.
  • Dinwiddy, J.R., From Luddism to the First Reform Bill, 1810-1832.
  • Joyce, P., Visions of the People: Industrial Reform and the Question of Class, 1840-1914.
  • Kirk. N., Change, Continuity and Class: Labour in British Society 1850-1920.
  • Pelling, H.,  A History of British Trade Unionism.
  • Pelling, H., A Short History of the Labour Party.
  • Powell, D.,  British Politics and the Labour Question, 1868-1990.
  • Rule, J., The Labouring Classes in Early Industrial England , 1750-1850.
  • Thompson, E.P.,  The Making of the English Working Class.
  • Thorpe, A., A History of the British Labour Party.

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  The module is taught through a series of two-hour weekly seminars.  Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment:  The grade is based on an essay of 2500 words (45%), a two-hour examination (45%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9W6 Environment, politics and people in colonial Africa

Module Content:  The module will focus on both human interaction with the African environment and intra-human interaction on environmental issues during the colonial era.  Particular attention will be paid to African interaction with, and knowledge, consumption and management of natural resources and  the environmental impact of colonial rule.  Themes addressed in the module will include ecological imperialism, the European hunting ethos, wildlife conservation and the creation of game reserves, colonial science and natural resource management, natural resource exploitation, and the environmental impact of colonial rule on the human and natural environments in Africa.

Learning Outcomes: This module seeks to challenge perceptions of Western intellectual and scientific superiority at the end of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth century, by focusing on the environmental impact of colonial policies that aimed at regulating the African environment and the interaction of African peoples with this environment.  It seeks to deepen history-specific skills already acquired and to help extend further a range of transferable skills. A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9 or 10.   It is recommended that students should have completed either module HIS9E4 or HIS9E5Not available to students who have completed HIS9V4.

Module Literature:  The following books will serve as a useful introduction to the module and the issues to be examined:

  • M. Leach and R. Mearns (eds), The lie of the land: challenging received wisdom on the African environment, Oxford: James Currey, 1996.
  • D. Anderson and R. Grove (eds), Conservation in Africa: people, politics and practice, Cambridge : Cambridge University Press, 1987.
  • G. Maddox, J.L. Giblin and I.N. Kimambo (eds), Custodians of the land: ecology and culture in the history of Tanzania , London : James Currey, 1996.
  • J. Carruthers, A political history of the Kruger National Park . Pietermaritzburgh: Natal University Press, 1995
  • W. Beinart and P. Coates, Environment and history: the taming of nature in the USA and Africa, London : Routledge, 1995.
  • W. Beinart, Putting a plough into the ground: accumulation and dispossession in rural South Africa , 1850-1930, Johannesburg : Raven Press.
  • T. Griffiths and L. Robin (eds), Ecology and Empire. Edinburgh : Keele University Press, 1996.

Module Structure:  The module is taught through a series of two-hour weekly seminars.  Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: The grade is based on an essay of 2500 words (45%), a two-hour examination (45%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9X6 Dissertation Preparation for Honours History

Module Content:  The module prepares students to undertake historical research for their dissertation. It provide students with a knowledge and understanding of historical theory and research methods and the variety of approaches to interpretations of the past. It enables students to apply theory and method to their own historical work.

Learning outcomes:  Lectures and seminars explore theories about the nature of history and historical methods pertaining to postmodernism, national identity, gender, and class that students can apply in their own dissertation research. Guidance is provided in designing research proposals, conducting research, and writing dissertations, and utilising research skills in the employment market.

By the end of the module students should be able to
• Design a research project;
• Apply a limited range of theories and methods in their own research;
• Conduct empirical research with a deeper, reflective awareness of the discipline of history;
• Critically evaluate theoretical imperatives in research;
• Construct effective research strategies;
• Consider a range of careers’ opportunities including those requiring research skills.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9 or 10 (restricted to those intending to take HIS9X7 or HIS9X8.

Module Literature:  The following are useful introductions to historical theory and method:

  • •Joyce Appleby, Lynn Avery Hunt, and Margaret C. Jacob, Telling the Truth about History (1994).
    •Michael Bentley, Modern Historiography: An Introduction (1999). E-Book
    •Richard Evans, In Defence of History (1997).
    •Marnie Hughes-Warrington, Fifty Key Thinkers of History (2000)
    •Ludmilla Jordanova, History in Practice (2000).
    •Arthur Marwick, The Nature of History (1989)
    •John Tosh, The Pursuit of History (1999).
    •John Tosh, Historians on History (2000).

Module Structure:  There will be a combination of lectures, seminars and dissertation workshops.  Attendance at seminars, a computer workshop and the lecture on the use of libraries is compulsory since they are prescribed classes and preparation for the seminars essential. 

Assessment: The grade is based on an essay of 2500 words (45%), a dissertation proposal of 2500 words (45%) and oral work (10%). 

 

HISU9A5: Feeding the masses: Environmental degradation in Europe c.900-c.1400

Module Content:  This module focuses on the progress and impact of the phenomena labelled as 'the medieval fish horizon' in the North Atlantic World and Europe between the eighth and seventeenth centuries, setting the cultural and socio-economic developments within a wider environmental context. This course will utilise equally the skills pertaining to two very distinct disciplines, history and environmental science, genuinely amalgamating the two approaches to help explain some aspects of the medieval environmental history of both the North Atlantic world and Europe.

The aim of the module is to provide students with a sound knowledge and understanding of a crucial period in medieval history through critical assessment of primary source documents and archaeology (particularly zooarchaeology) from across the North Atlantic zone. In doing so, they will be expected to engage with economic, environmental, and social histories. The aim of this module is to explore the history of piscine exploitation within the context of the North Atlantic and western Christianity, broadening students’ understanding of the cultural, political, ecclesiastic, and climatic forces that shaped so much of medieval Europe in the post 1000AD period. It further seeks to introduce the students to sources of information that they will not have previously encountered, encouraging them to engage in inter-disciplinary studies.

Throughout, the module will focus on the challenges and opportunities of working with different sorts of evidence, and different approaches to that evidence. Upon completion, it is expected that the students will know how different types of evidence can be successfully utilised to supplement, inform, and enhance an often contradictory historical record. The module will also provide the students with the opportunity to work with primary sources from many different countries, thereby enhancing their analytical skills.

Learning Outcomes: 

Knowledge and understanding

  • command a substantial knowledge of the early medieval peoples of Scotland and their place in our understanding of North Atlantic history, archaeology, and zooarchaeology
  • understand and critically assess key current debates about the early medieval peoples of Europe and the North Atlantic drawing on materials from historical, archaeological, zooarchaeological sources.

By the end of the course, the successful student will be able to demonstrate:

  • a capacity to work independently and in groups, and to manage time effectively
  • the application of literature searching skills
  • a capacity for organisation, clarity and fluency in written expression
  • oral and audio-visual communication skills
  • inter-personal skills.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Prerequisite:  One History module at level 9. 

Module Literature: 

  • John Aberth, An Environmental History of the Middle Ages (Abingdon, 2013).
  • Robert Bartlett, The Making of Europe (London, 1993)
  • Alastair Dawson, So Foul and Fair a Day (Glasgow, 2009).
  • Brian Fagan, The Little Ice Age (New York, 2000).
  • Richard Hoffmann, An Environmental History of Medieval Europe (Cambridge, 2014)
  • I.G. Simmons, An Environmental History of Great Britain from 10,000 Years Ago to the Present(Edinburgh, 2001).

Module Structure:  

The module is taught by weekly seminars lasting two hours each. Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them. 

Assessment: 

The grade is based on one essay of 2500 words (60%), one 'critical review' of a secondary source of 1500 words (30%) and oral work (10%).

ARTUHX5 : Heritage Protection: theory and practice

Module Content:   This core Heritage module identifies and assesses what holistic protection of the historic environment, particularly the archaeological resource, involves. It develops and deepens heritage-specific knowledge and skills.

Learning Outcomes:

The module will explore the nature of the surviving historic environment, the threats to it and strategies for its protection. With a focus primarily on the archaeological resource, it will seek to understand why, how and in what ways strategies for the protection of the historic environment have evolved by acknowledging the legal, policy, operational and institutional frameworks within which heritage managers work. It will consider the role of an evidence base, appropriate responses to this, and the sorts of broader supporting actions that may also be necessary. The emphasis will be on the UK, while learning from examples of best practice from elsewhere.

By the end of the module students will possess the ability to:
• critically review the sources provided by heritage bodies for understanding the historic environment, its significance, its condition, risks to it, and opportunities for its protection
• assess the nature, scale and degree of some specific threats to different parts of the built environment
• evaluate the effectiveness of past, present and planned future strategies for the protection of the historic environment
• evaluate the place of formal designation in broader protection strategies

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9 or 10.

Module Literature: 

There are three particular textbooks that offer relevant background that students may find helpful because they provide context for (a) heritage management in the UK and (b) the nature of the archaeological resource in Scotland / Britain.
HUNTER, J.R. and RALSTON, I., eds, 2006. Archaeological Resource Management in the UK: An Introduction. 2nd edn. Stroud: Sutton Publishing Ltd.
EDWARDS, K.J. and RALSTON, I., eds, 2003. Scotland After the Ice Age: Environment, Archaeology and History 8000 BC - AD 1000. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
HUNTER, J. and RALSTON, I., eds, 2009. The Archaeology of Britain. An Introduction from Earliest Times to the Twenty-First Century. 2nd edn. London and New York: Routledge.

Module Structure:  The module is taught through a series of two-hour seminars per week.  Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: 

Critical review essay (1,500 words) (25%)

Essay (2,500 words) (60%)

Oral contribution (15%) Generic skills (e.g. Information skills/oral and written communication skills/numeracy/team working/personal organisational skills).

ARTUHR5 : Interpretation and Exhibition Design

Module Content:  This course increases knowledge of museum and gallery curatorial practice in exhibition design and interpretation.  The course will use as its inspiration the MLA Accredited Art Collection at the University and utilise the Special Collections and Archives for hands-on practical experience of curatorial methods.  Students will have the opportunity to work with curators and develop exhibition design skills as part of the Art Collection’s programme of exhibitions.  The course is intended as a foundation course to provide basic skills needed for HISUH7X.

Learning Outcomes: 

In the course of this module students are expected to achieve a close understanding of exhibition design and interpretation practices. This is achieved by a mixture of theoretical and practical sessions. Topics covered include:
• Museum buildings, exhibition space and design
• Researching an exhibition 
• Interpreting for display
• Exhibition design and project management 
• Collections care and management
• Presentation of exhibition proposals
• Online exhibitions
• Exhibition installation

By the end of this course students should have:
• achieved a close understanding of exhibition design and interpretation practices
• developed knowledge of collections management including archival skills.
• developed transferable analytical, communication and inter-personal skills.
• identified topics and approaches with potential for further study, either for final year undergraduate dissertation or post-graduate study.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9 or 10.

Module Literature: 

  • B Lord and M Piacente, Manual of Museum Exhibitions (2nd Edition, Rowman & Littlefield, 2014).
  • Elizabeth Bogle, Museum Exhibition Planning and Design (Alta Mira Press, 2013).
  • John M A Thompson, (ed.) Manual of Curatorship: A Guide to Museum Practice (2nd Edition,   Routledge, 1992).
  • G Black, The Engaging Museum: Developing Museums for Visitor Involvement (Routledge, 2005). 

Module Structure:  The module is taught through a series of two-hour seminars per week.  Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: 

One 2,500 word exhibition portfolio 50% of the overall grade]; weekly oral contribution and two individual short presentations [20% of overall grade]; 1,500 critical exhibition review either in the form of an evaluation of an exhibition experience  or, undertaking a practical interpretation exercise [30% of grade].

HISU9X5 History Dissertation Preparation for Combined degrees

Module Content:  The aim of this module is to provide students doing a combined History and Professional Education degree with the chance to do a subject dissertation preparation module as offered to Honours History and Scottish History students. This would not only allow them to complete a History dissertation, which has proved difficult to schedule since the new degree structure has been introduced, but to have the best opportunity to succeed. They will do the short dissertation (HISU9X8) of 9-11,000 words in semester 8. HISU9X5 will be a core module for ITE students and also for those on variant programmes as an alternative to the identical HISU9X6.

The module aims to prepare students to undertake historical research for their dissertation. It provide students with a knowledge and understanding of historical theory and research methods and the variety of approaches to interpretations of the past. It enables students to apply theory and method to their own historical work.

On the completion of the module students should be prepared for the rigours of researching, planning and delivering a dissertation with analytical credibility. They will be prepared for the short dissertation (HISU9X8) of 9-11,000 words tackled in semester 8

Learning outcomes: 

This module offers the following learning outcomes:

Knowledge and understanding

  • An understanding of historical theory.

  • An understanding of a variety of approaches to choosing and writing a dissertation.

  • A capacity to evaluate conflicting historical interpretations.

  • An understanding of the application of historical theory.

 Historical skills

  • An understanding of the problematic nature of the past.

  • An appreciation of the complexity and diversity of the past.

  • An understanding of the limitations of historical knowledge.

  • A capacity to collect evidence to test or support a historical case.

  • An awareness of the importance of debate in history.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at Level 9

Module Literature:  The following are useful introductions to historical theory:

  •  Joyce Appleby, Lynn Avery Hunt, and Margaret C. Jacob, Telling the Truth about History  (1994).
  • Michael Bentley, Modern Historiography: An Introduction (1999). E-Book
  • Richard Evans, In Defence of History (1997).
  • Marnie Hughes-Warrington, Fifty Key Thinkers of History (2000)
  • Ludmilla Jordanova, History in Practice (2000).
  • Arthur Marwick, The Nature of History (1989)
  • John Tosh, The Pursuit of History (1999).
  • John Tosh, Historians on History (2000).

Module Structure: 

The module is taught through 10 one-hour lectures, a series of 6 two-hour weekly seminars and careers, computing and library workshops.  Library and computing workshops are to help improve research for dissertations while careers workshops are to encourage reflection on the future. Different themes of historical study, such as postmodernism, national identity, gender and class are considered at the seminars each week and students prepare through allocated reading and in the light of a series key issues or questions for debate, embracing historiography. These sessions and the skills workshops are designed to prepare students for dissertation realisation, the themes for their first essays and their dissertation proposal essays. All secondary reading is aimed to enhance the necessary analytical skills. Seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.  As such students are in large or small groups expected to contribute to debate out of which the widest possible interpretive landscape is created. Preparation is essential in order to facilitate discussion of the topics covered and to enable the continued development of historical skills.

Assessment: 

One essay of 2,5000 words on historical theory and method (45%); a second essay of 2,500 words in the form of a dissertation proposal (45%); and oral contribution averaged across all seminars (10%)

HISUM06 : American Indian History and Policy: From survival to Sovereignty

Module Content:  The module aims to provide students with an understanding of some of the main trends and developments in American Indian history and policy, from the era of Contact and Exploration, with a focus on the colonial era through the birth and growth of the United States, to the 1992 Columbus Quincentenary. It seeks to impart lexical knowledge, conceptual frameworks, deepen history-specific skills already acquired, and to help extend further a range of transferable skills.

Learning Outcomes: By the end of this course students should be able to:

• Grasp the major timeline, figures, events and geography of American Indian history (chronological, lexical and causal).
• Appreciably understand the major historical themes in American Indian history and policy: the means of colonization by European powers of the Native American population; the changes in European and especially the U.S. government’s Indian policy; the phases and consequences of colonization; the concept of American Indian agency; the Native responses to colonization (adjustment, resistance, survival, assimilation, revival); the diversity and overarching similarities of American Indian experiences of post-Contact history.
• Evaluate conflicting historical interpretations.
• Show a capacity to collect evidence to test or support historical cases in writing and in oral presentation
• Locate source material and critically evaluate historical documents.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9 or 10.

Module Literature: 

  • Stuart Banner, How the Indians Lost Their Land: Law and Power on the Frontier. Cambridge, London: Belknap/Harvard University Press, 2005.
  • Colin G. Calloway, First Peoples: A Documentary Survey of American Indian History. Boston: Bedford/St. Martin's, 2008.
  • Albert L. Hurtado and Peter Iverson, eds., Major Problems in American Indian History. Boston, New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2001 (2nd edition).
  • Daniel K. Richter, Facing East from Indian Country: a Native History of Early America. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2001.
  • Robert J. Miller, Native America, Discovered and Conquered: Thomas Jefferson, Lewis & Clark, and Manifest Destiny. Westport, Conn.: Praeger Publishers, 2006.
  • Jill Norgren, The Cherokee Cases: Two Landmark Federal Decisions in the Fight for Sovereignty. Norman, Oklahoma: University of Oklahoma Press, 2004.
  • Robert M. Utley and Wilcomb E. Washburn, Indian Wars. Boston, MA: Houghton Mifflin, 2002.
  • Kenneth R. Philp, Termination Revisited: American Indians on the Trail to Self-Determination, 1933-1953. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1999.
  • Charles Wilkinson, Blood Struggle: The Rise of Modern Indian Nations. New York: Norton, 2005.
  • Daniel Cobb, Native Activism in Cold War America: The Struggle for Sovereignty. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2008.
  • Paul Chaat Smith and Robert Allen Warrior, Like a Hurricane: The Indian Movement from Alcatraz to Wounded Knee. New York: New Press, 1996.
  • George Pierre Castile, Taking Charge: Native American Self-Determination and Federal Indian Policy, 1975-1993. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2006.

Module Structure:  The module is taught through a series of two-hour seminars per week.  Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them. 

Assessment: 

One 2,500 word essay from a range of questions on political, cultural and socio-economic topics [45% of grade]

Weekly oral contribution averages and one formal student-designed presentation [10% of grade]

Two-hour Examination [45% of grade]

              

HISUJ06 : Picts in Perspective: archaeology and the historian

Module Content:  The aim of this module is to explore the evidence for the Picts, one of the early medieval peoples of north Britain, in the context of their neighbours and contemporary Europe more generally. Working in an early historic period, it seeks to develop new disciplinary and interdisciplinary knowledge and skills, which are a pre-requisite for studying the first millennium AD, and to help extend further a range of transferable skills. Archaeological, art historical, historic and place-name sources and approaches will be used to critically assess our understanding of the Picts and their neighbours, and to establish the relevance of their study for European archaeology more widely. The evidence for the early church will be a substantive theme. Throughout, the module will focus on the challenges and opportunities of working with different sorts of evidence, and different approaches to that evidence. The module will also consider the more recent historiography of the Picts and their neighbours, as well as modern uses of them in interpreting and presenting Scotland’s past to the public.

Learning Outcomes: 

By the end of this module, the successful student should be able to:
• critically assess key debates about the early medieval peoples of Scotland, and their place in European archaeology, drawing on sources from archaeological, art-historical and toponymic, as well as historical, sources,
• judge the complexity of constructing the early historic past from different types of sources and the problematic and varied nature of these source,
• evaluate the development of study of the early historic period as a subject,
• evaluate the types of questions and methodologies that different disciplines use and how these have changed with time.

Pre-requisite:  One History module at level 9 or 10.

Module Literature: 

Before commencing the course it will be helpful to familiarise yourself with current thinking about who the Picts were and to develop some understanding of what archaeological evidence is and how it is approached.

CARVER, M., 2009. Archaeological Investigation. London & New York: Routledge.
CLARKE, D.V., BLACKWELL, A. and GOLDBERG, M., 2012. Early Medieval Scotland. Individuals, Communities and Ideas. Edinburgh: National Museums Scotland.
DRISCOLL, S.T., 2002. Alba. The Gaelic Kingdom of Scotland AD 800–1124. Edinburgh: Birlinn.
FOSTER, S.M., 2014. Picts, Gaels and Scots: Early Historic Scotland. 3rd edn. Edinburgh: Birlinn.
FRASER, J.E., 2009. From Caledonia to Pictland. Scotland to 795. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
WOOLF, A., 2007. From Pictland to Alba 789-1070. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.

Module Structure:  The module is taught through a series of two-hour seminars per week.  Attendance at seminars is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: 

Essay (3,000 words) (45%)

Exam (45%)

Oral contribution (10%)

ARTUHN6 History, Heritage and Tradition

Module Description 

The module aims to provide students with an understanding of central aspects of the study of as heritage, identity, memory and the invention of tradition in manners equally relevant to History and Heritage studies and degree programmes. A focus on nationalism and the nation-state will be a prominent aspect of this course unit.

Learning Objectives 

In the course of taking this module students are expected to gain understanding of the principal determinants in the relationship between heritage, tradition, memory and identity. Themes covered included:
• The link between historical enquiry and the production of modern identities
• The processes involved in the (re)invention of traditions
• The production of cultural memory
• The role of tangible and intangible heritage
• Institutional involvement in collection, conservation, and presentation

By the end of the course successful student will have:
• a knowledge of theories of nationalism, heritage and identity (including debates about the formation of the modern nation-state)
• acquired an understanding of the role of the past in the formation of modern identities (including the invention of tradition and the production of cultural memory)
• examined how these processes impact on the collection, conservation and presentation of heritage
• critically reflected on the politics of the past (including territorial disputes and conflicts over cultural property)
• acquired a good knowledge of a number of detailed case studies from Scotland and beyond
• developed an understanding of the impact of nationalism on the discipline of history and vice versa

Module Literature 

Anderson, B. 2006. Imagined Communities: Reflections on the Origin and Spread of Nationalism. Revised Edition ed. London and New York: Verso, 2nd Revised Edition. [Chapter 1 ‘Introduction’ & Chapter 10 ‘Census, map, museum’]
Hutchinson, J. and A.D. Smith 1994 Nationalism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Handler, R. 1988. Nationalism and the Politics of Culture in Quebec. Madison: University of Wisconsin Press. [Chapter 6: ‘Having a culture, preservation of Quebec’s Patrimoine.]
Hobsbawm, E.  1992.  'Ethnicity and nationalism in Europe today'  Anthropology Today 8(1): 3-8.
Hobsbawm, E. and T. Ranger (eds) 1983 The Invention of Tradition. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.
Macdonald, S. 2003. 'Museums, national, postnational and transcultural identities' Museum and Society 1 (1): 1-16
Penrose, J. and C. Cumming 2011. 'Money talks: banknote iconography and symbolic constructions of Scotland' Nations and Nationalism 17 (4), 2011, 821–842.
Smith A.D. 2013. ‘The land and its people’: reflections on artistic identification in an age of nations and nationalism. Nations and Nationalism 19(1): 87–106.

Module Structure 

Teaching will involve a mixture of lecturing and seminar discussion in two-hour sessions over 10 weeks.

Assessment 

An essay of 2500 words (45%),

A two hour exam (45%)

Oral contribution to seminars (10%) 

ARTU9H5: Death, Disease and Disability

Death, Disease and Disability:The State and the Hazardous Working Environment 1800-1914

Module Content: 

The module offers the student an introduction to the history of the development of health and safety legislation, occupational health medicine and safety technology based around a series of case studies that follow a broad chronological progression across 19th and early 20th century Britain.

Learning Outcomes: 

Topics include:
Child labour and early factory reform;  1842 Children’s Employment Commission (with a particular emphasis on women in the coal mines before and after legislation); Gender using a series of focused studies: the Cornish Bal Maidens and machismo and risk in the coal mining and ship building industries; the role of reforming interests, safety societies, key individuals e.g. Lord Shaftesbury and trade union leaders; the development of Occupational Health Medicine and development of safety technology; the 'dust diseases'; the Factory Inspectors (including the role of Lady Inspectors);  and the development of workers’ compensation and  the ‘dangerous trades’ and the regulation of lead, arsenic, phosphorous and anthrax.

By the end of this module students should possess the ability to:

  • Evaluate critically the development of health and safety legislation in Britain
  • Assess critically understandings of the processes of policy creation in this field
  • Judge the significance of occupational health medicine
  • Assess the role of safety technology in the improvement of working conditions
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the relevance of 'policy relevance' to historical research.

Module Literature:

There is no core single text for this module. For a taster of the themes covered in the module. students may wish to dip into

  • J. L. Bronstein, Caught in the Machinery: Workplace Accidents and Injured Workers in Nineteenth-Century Britain (Stanford: Stanford University Press, 2008); 
  • P. Bartrip & S. Burman, The Wounded Soldiers of Industry: Industrial Compensation Policy, 1833-1897 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1983);
  • B. Harrison, Not Only the Dangerous Trades: Women's Work and Health in Britain, 1880-1914 (London: Taylor and Francis, 1996);
  • B. Hutchins & A. Harrison, A History of Factory Legislation(London: King, 1926);
  • A. John, By the Sweat of their Brow: Women Workers at Victorian Coal Mines (London: Croom Helm, 1984);
  • A. McIvor & R. Johnston, Miners' Lung: A History of Dust Diseases in British Coal Mining (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2007);
  • C. Mills, Regulating Health and Safety in the British Mining Industries, 1800-1914 (Aldershot: Ashgate, 2010).

Module Structure

The module is taught through weekly two-hour seminars. The seminars cover the module themes each week following a rough chronological order and are underpinned by a reading 'handout' with supplementary material such as relevant web links and film documentaries provided on Succeed.  

Assessments 

A critical review of 1,500 words (30%)

A second, full History essay of 2,500 words (60%)

Oral contribution (10%)

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