4th Year Conference

The Faculty of Arts and Humanities will be hosting a 4th Year Conference in September 2017 (date to be confirmed).

Further details will be available next year.

 

HISU9X7: History Dissertation

The HIS9X7 dissertation is taken in their final year by Honours History candidates.  Students are not permitted to choose a dissertation topic that overlaps with their special subject.

In semester 6 all Honours History candidates take module HIS9X6:  Approaches and Methods in History as part of the preparation for researching and writing their dissertation in the final year.  The module gives both a formal grounding in historical theory and introduces students to the skills they will need in their dissertation.  It involves the drafting of an outline dissertation proposal, which will have been discussed and approved by the future supervisor.

Further details are given in the notes of guidance about dissertations, which is document 12 in part D.  Students taking the dissertation are required to submit either two or three pieces of written work during the autumn semester.  Usually the bulk of the research for the dissertation is done before the start of the eighth semester. 

Two copies of the dissertation have to be submitted.  The student can reclaim one copy after the award of the degree.  The other copy may be retained by the School.

HISU9X8 Dissertation in History for Combined Degrees

tempus fugit

HISU9A7 Living on the Edge?

HISU9A7: Living on the Edge? Environment, Landscape and Improvement in the North Atlantic World c.1500 to c.1900

Module Content:  This module focuses on the progress and impact of the phenomena labelled as 'Improvement and Modernity' in the North Atlantic World between the 16th and 19th centuries.  It sets the profound cultural and socio-economic changes in Britain and Ireland, Iceland and western Scandinavia which characterised this period into their wider environmental context.   The course promotes greater understanding of the interplay of anthropogenic and natural processes in a period which witnessed the beginnings and full force of a seismic shift in Western European intellectual, social and economic structures.  It will explore the intellectual development of attitudes to environmental resource exploitation, charting the development from the fundamental Christian cornucopian view, through the more rigorously utilitarian modes of the Enlightenment, to the emerging Malthusian capitalist regimes of the early 19th century.  Many of these changing attitudes were underpinned by the shifting perceptions of Nature, ethnography, race and exploitation.   Alongside this intellectual context, the module will address key issues such as climate-change; intensifying levels of exploitation of marine and terrestrial resources; industrialisation and urbanisation; concepts and experiences of crises in supply of resources; the impact of epidemic and disease; and the emergence of the 'Improvement Myth' which still influences many historical perceptions of the processes at work across this period. It aims to provide students with a greater understanding of the depth of the impact of environmental determinants on society and socio-economic factors on the environment, and to enable them to assume personal intellectual responsibility in the definition of problems, the formulation of arguments and the identification of sources.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  The module is restricted to 4th-year honours students.

Module Literature:  Environmental History is a relatively new discipline, and there is no single textbook that deals with all the different aspects we teach in this module. However, there is a good general textbook that should be available at the start of semester both in the library and from the University Bookshop:

I.G. Simmons, An Environmental History of Great Britain from 10,000 Years Ago to the Present. Edinburgh University Press (Edinburgh, 2001).

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  The module will be taught through weekly seminars, each lasting three hours.  Attendance is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: The grade is based on three essays of up to 4000 words (together 50%), two two-hour examinations (together 40%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9B7 'Around 1968' Protest movements and social activism in the UK and Europe

Module Content:  The module will examine the political, social and cultural history of protests and activism in the UK (including Northern Ireland) and Europe (with special emphasis on Germany, France and Italy) in the ‘long sixties‘, from around 1956 to the early 1970s. We will discuss the variety of activism during this time period, ranging from protests for peace and civil rights, over the political and cultural activism of the New Left to the emergence of terrorist movements in the early 1970s. The course pays special attention to the ways in which activists‘ experiences and memories interacted.

Learning Outcomes:  The aim of the module is to provide students with a deep and conceptual knowledge of the causes and course of political and social activism in Europe’s most tumultuous post-World War Two decade, from the emergence of peace activism in the late 1950s to the rise of groups that used political violence to further their aims. Through close reading and discussion, students will be enabled to assume personal responsibility in the definition of problems, the formulation of arguments, and the identification of sources.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  The module is restricted to 4th-year Honours students.

Module Literature: 

Useful introductory reading over the summer might include some of the following:

  • Mark Donnelly, Sixties Britain. Culture, Society and Politics (London: Pan, 2005).
  • Gerard de Groot, The Sixties Unplugged: A Kaleidoscopic History of a Disorderly Decade (London, 2009).
  • Robert Gildea, James Mark and Anette Waring, eds, Europe’s 1968. Voices of Revolt (Oxford: OUP, 2013).
  • Gerd-Rainer Horn, The Spirit of ’68. Rebellion in Western Europe and North America, 1956-1976 (Oxford: OUP, 2007).
  • Martin Klimke and Joachim Scharloth, eds, 1968 in Europe. A History of Protest and Activism, 1956-1977 (Basingstoke: Palgrave, 2008).
  • Arthur Marwick, The Sixties Cultural Revolution in Britain France Italy and the United States, c.1958-c.1974 (Oxford: OUP, 1998).

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  The module will be taught through weekly seminars, each lasting three hours.  Attendance is vital and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: The grade is based on three essays of up to 4000 words (together 50%), two two-hour examinations (together 40%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9D7: The American Revolution

Module Content:  The module explores the origins and nature of the American Revolution roughly from 1760 to 1787.  It begins with examinations of American colonial politics, society and government, and proceeds to review the imperial relationship before the Revolution, including imperial administration and commerce.  Subsequent topics are studied in depth:  the imperial crises 1765-1774, the War of Independence, the revolutionary movement, Loyalism and counter-revolution, and the "making" of the United States.  The Revolution's impact upon the British Isles is considered more briefly.  Emphasis is placed upon ideology and political behaviour although political economy, government, and social history are also covered.

Learning Outcomes:  The module aims to provide students with an in depth understanding of the origins and nature of the American Revolution, roughly from 1750 to 1790, and to enable them to assume personal intellectual responsibility in the definition of problems, the formulation of arguments, and the identification of sources.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  The module is restricted to 4th-year Honours students.

Module Literature:  Recommended purchases:

  • Bernard Bailyn, The Ideological Origins of the American Revolution (1967, 1992)
  • Richard D. Brown, ed., Major Problems in the Era of the American Revolution, 1760-1791 (1992).
  • Stephen Conway, The War of Independence, 1775-1783 (1995) or Piers Mackesy, The War for America, 1775-1783 (1964, 1992) or Don Higginbotham, The War of American Independence: military attitudes, policies and practice, 1763-1789 (1983).
  • Edward Countryman, The American Revolution or Colin Bonwick, The American Revolution or Frank Cogliano, Revolutionary America, 1763-1815:  A Political History.
  • Colin Nicolson, the 'Infamas Govener': Francis Bernard and the Origins of the American Revolution (2001).
  • Harry M. Ward, The War for Independence and the Transformation of American Society (1999).
  • Gordon S. Wood, The Radicalism of the American Revolution (1992).

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  There is one three-hour seminar per week based on student papers.  Each student will present two papers.  There are a few computer laboratories, at which attendance and participation is compulsory.  Attendance is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: The grade is based on three essays of up to 4000 words (together 50%), two two-hour examinations (together 40%) and oral work (10%). 

HISU9E7: Apartheid in South Africa, 1948-1994

Module Content:  The module focuses on the rise, functioning and decline of apartheid in South Africa, resistance to the apartheid state from groups such as the ANC and the PAC, the way in which various ethnic religious, cultural and political groups interacted with the apartheid state (either in opposition or in support), and the impact of apartheid on South African society.

Learning Outcomes:  The module aims to provide students with an understanding in depth of the policy of apartheid in South Africa between 1948 and 1994, the impact this policy had on the country and its people, and resistance to apartheid from South African anti-apartheid organisations, and to enable them to assume intellectual responsibility in the definition of questions, the formulation of arguments and the identification of sources.

Pre-requisite:  The module is restricted to 4th-year Honours students.

Module Literature:

  • Beinart, William and Saul Dubow (eds), Segregation and apartheid in twentieth century South Africa, London: Routledge, 1995.
  • Giliomee, H. The Afrikaners: the biography of a people, Hurst, 2003.
  • Guelke, Adrian, Rethinking the rise and fall of apartheid: South Africa and world politics, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.
  • Krog, Antjie, Country of my skull: guilt, sorrow, and the limits of forgiveness in the new South Africa, New York, NY: Three Rivers Press, 2000.
  • Mandela, Nelson, Long walk to freedom: the autobiography of Nelson Mandela, London: Abacus, 1995.
  • Meli, Francis, A history of the ANC: South Africa belongs to us, London: James Currey, 1989.
  • O'Meara, Dan, Forty lost years: the apartheid state and the politics of the  National Party, 1948-1994, Randburg: Ravan Press, 1996.
  • Walshe, Peter, The rise of African nationalism in South Africa: the African National Congress, 1912-1952. London: C. Hurst, 1970.
  • Worden, Nigel, The making of modern South Africa: conquest, segregation and apartheid, 3rd ed., Oxford, 2000.

Module Structure:  There are no formal lectures.  There will be a weekly three-hour seminar which will involve a combination of student presentations, discussions and examination of primary source materials.  Individual reading assignments will be allocated for each seminar though students will be expected to do independent background reading in addition to the specific allocations.   Attendance is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them. 

Assessment: The grade is based on three essays of up to 4000 words (together 50%), two two-hour examinations (together 40%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9F7 Britain in the Age of the French and American Revolutions

Module Content:  The module is likely to include the following topics: British politics in the mid-eighteenth century, the British government and the American Revolution, the Opposition and the Friends of America, public opinion and extra-parliamentary politics, Britain and the war for America, the 1780s: peace and the consequences of war, Edmund Burke, Thomas Paine, radicals and revolutionaries, the Pitt administration and its successors, popular conservatism and militant loyalism, the Opposition Whigs, public opinion and popular protest, religious responses, Ireland, George III, and Britain in the Age of Revolutions.

Learning Outcomes:  The module aims to provide an understanding of the development of British parliamentary and popular politics c.1760-1815, through the consideration of British responses to the revolutions in, and wars against, America and France; and to enable students to assume personal intellectual responsibility in the definition of problems, the formulation of arguments and the identification of sources.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  The module is restricted to 4th-year Honours students.

Module Literature:  The following will provide a useful introduction to the module:

  • H.T. Dickinson (ed.), Britain and the American Revolution (1998).
  • Colin Bonwick, English Radicals and the American Revolution (1977).
  • Ian R. Christie, Wars and Revolutions: Britain 1760-1815 (1982).
  • Paul Langford, A Polite and Commercial People: England 1727-1783 (1989).
  • H.T. Dickinson (ed.), Britain and the French Revolution 1789-1815 (1989).
  • Clive Emsley, British Society and the French Wars 1793-1815 (1979).
  • Linda Colley, Britons: Forging the Nation 1707-1837 (1992).
  • Stephen Conway, The British Isles and the War of American Independence (2000).

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  The module is studied through eighteen weekly seminars, each lasting three hours.  Seminar discussions will be based on both secondary and primary source material.  Attendance is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: The grade is based on three essays of up to 4000 words (together 50%), two two-hour examinations (together 40%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9G7 Immigration to Britain from the 1880s to the 1980s

Module Content:  This module examines the social and political impact of immigration to Britain during the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Topics covered include patterns of immigration from the 1880s to 1970s; government and public responses to immigration; the Aliens Act, 1905; anti-alienism, Fascism and anti-Semitism; experiences of specific immigrant groups (including Irish, eastern European Jews, Germans, Poles, Lithuanians, Chinese, Italians, South Asians and Afro-Caribbeans); responses to immigrants during World Wars 1 and 2; post-1945 immigration from Europe and the New Commonwealth; government restriction of immigration from 1962-1971.

Learning Outcomes:  The module aims to provide students with an understanding of the causes, course and consequences, of immigration to Britain in the period, allowing the assessment of the views of immigrants themselves, the response of public, state agencies and government to the new arrivals.  The module enables students to assume personal intellectual responsibility in the definition of problems, the formulation of arguments and the identification of sources. 

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  The module is restricted to 4th year Honours students.

Module Literature:

  • C. Holmes, John Bull’s Island: Immigration and British Society 1871-1971 (Macmillan, 1988)
  • C. Holmes, A Tolerant Country? : Immigrants, Refugees and Minorities (Faber and Faber, 1991)
  • P. Panayi, An Immigration History of Britain: multicultural racism since 1800 (Longman, 2010)
  • P. Panayi, Immigration, Ethnicity and Racism in Britain 1815-1945 (Manchester University Press, 1994)
  • P. Panayi, The Impact of Immigration: a documentary history of the effects and experiences of immigrants in Britain since 1945 (MUP, 1999)
  • I.R.G. Spencer, British Immigration Policy Since 1939: the making of multi-cultural Britain (Routledge, 1997)
  • K. Paul, Whitewashing Britain: race and citizenship in the post-war era (Cornell Univ. Press, NY, 1997)

 Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  The module will be taught through weekly seminars, each lasting three hours.  Students are expected to participate in all seminar discussions and to present formal papers of their own.  Primary source materials will be used in all seminars.  Attendance is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: The grade is based on three essays of up to 4000 words (together 50%), two two-hour examinations (together 40%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9J7 Mobilise! Petition drives and popular politics in the West, from 1600

Module Content:  The module focuses on the changes in the forms of collective political participation since the early modern period (c 1600) to the present. After a general introduction on the historical study of the forms of political action, the backbone of the module will be the study of the changes in the practices and meanings of petition drives between places and times, from the corporate order of Ancien Regime Europe to the transnational disorder of the Digital Age. The seminars will explore four major themes: 1) From “corporate” to “monster” petitioning 1600-1820: the birth of the national political arena in different European countries; 2) Petitioning and the dynamics of citizenship in nation states: taxes, social movements and the voice of women (1780-1914);   3) Plebiscitary petitioning and the legitimation of authority, from Louis Bonaparte to the Peace Movement in Communist Europe (1848-1968); 4) Transnational arenas: from nineteenth century catholic campaigning against Italy to the Internet (1848-).

This systematic focus on one particular form of collective action will allow the student to understand the momentous changes in the structure of the political arena, from the society or orders to the nation state, and from the nation state to international society.  In parallel, this will be a history of the practice and contents of political citizenship in a historical and comparative perspective.

 

Learning Outcomes:  This will diversify the thematic and the area coverage in history modules and give students the opportunity to specialise and practice comparative historical analysis.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

 

Pre-requisite:  The module is restricted to 4th-year Honours students.

 

Module Literature: 

W. P. Te Brake, Shaping history: ordinary people in European politics, 1500-1700, (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1998). http://ark.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/ft500006j4/

P. Cossart, From Deliberation to Demonstration. Political Rallies in France, 1868–1939, (Colchester: ECPR Press, 2013).

M. Knights, 'Participation and representation before democracy: petitions and addresses in premodern Britain' in Political representation, ed. I. Shapiro (Cambridge, UK ; New York: Cambridge University Press, 2009).

C. Leys, 'Petitioning in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries', in Political Studies (1955), Vol. 1, n. 3.

J. Markoff, The abolition of feudalism: peasants, lords, and legislators in the French Revolution, (University Park, Pa.: Pennsylvania State University Press, 1996).

E. S. Morgan, Inventing the people: the rise of popular sovereignty in England and America, (New York: Norton, 1988).

P. Rosanvallon, Counter-Democracy: Politics in an Age of Distrust, (Leiden: Cambridge University Press, 2008).

S. G. Tarrow, Power in movement: social movements and contentious politics, (Cambridge University Press, 2011).

C. Tilly, Social Movements, 1768-2004, (London: Paradigm Publishers, 2004).

L. H. van Voss, 'Petitions in Social History', in International Review of Social History Supplements (Cambridge University Press, 2001).

S. Zaeske, Signatures of citizenship: petitioning, antislavery, and women's political identity, in Gender & American culture (Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003).

D. Zaret, Origins of democratic culture: printing, petitions, and the public sphere in early-modern England, in Princeton studies in cultural sociology (Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2000).

 

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  There is one three-hour seminar per week based on student papers. 

 

Assessment: The grade is based on three essays of up to 4000 words (together 50%), two two-hour examinations (together 40%) and oral work (10%). 

HISU9N7: Government and Society in Scotland 1800-1918

Module Content:  This module examines a variety of social and economic problems which emerged during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, how these problems were perceived and what responses were offered by the state, religious, political and voluntary agencies.  Topics covered in the module include: the population explosion and Malthusian responses; the formation of and condition of the industrial labour force; health and policing in the towns; treatment of the poor; education; famine and emigration from the Highlands; drink and prostitution; women in employment; housing; labour unrest; economic depression.

Learning Outcomes:  The module aims to provide students with an understanding of the sorts of problems which emerged in Scotland as it underwent rapid and sustained economic and social change in the period 1800 to 1918, together with the ways in which these problems were perceived by Government and other agencies and the responses made at providing solutions, and to enable them to assume personal intellectual responsibility in the definition of problems, the formulation of argument and the identification of sources.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  The module is restricted to 4th-year Honours students.

Module Literature:  The following will serve as useful textbooks:

  • S. & O. Checkland, Industry & Ethos: Scotland 1832-1914.
  • T.T.M. Devine & R. Finlay, Scotland in the Twentieth Century.
  • T.T.M. Devine & R. Mitchison, People and Society in Scotland Vol. 1, 1760-1830.
  • W.H. Fraser & R.J. Morris, People and Society in Scotland Vol. 2, 1830-1914.
  • J. McCaffrey, Scotland in the Nineteenth Century.
  • T.C. Smout, A History of the Scottish People, 1560-1830.
  • T.C. Smout, A Century of the Scottish People, 1830-1950.
  • C. Whatley, The Industrial Revolution in Scotland.

Module Structure:  There are no formal lectures.  The module will be taught through weekly seminars, each lasting three hours.  Students are expected to participate in all seminar discussions and to present formal papers of their own.  Primary source materials will be used in most seminars.  Attendance is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: The grade is based on three essays of up to 4000 words (together 50%), two two-hour examinations (together 40%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9Q7: 'Dark and Drublie Days', Bruce and Stewart Scotland, c.1329-c.1406

Module Content:  This module will involve a detailed study of the Crown-subject relations, foreign policy, economy, religion and culture of the Scottish kingdom in the decades after the first phase of the Wars of Independence, during the troubled reigns of David II (the last Bruce King) and those of Robert II and Robert III (the first Stewart Kings). Using contemporary government and family papers, chronicles and literature this module will examine the complex politics of these reigns to reveal the highly formative influence of this much neglected period on the exercise of power in the late medieval kingdom. Comparisons will also be made with contemporary England and Europe.

Learning Outcomes:  This module aims to encourage knowledge and understanding in depth of themes and debates in Scottish history c. 1329-1406, and to enable students to assume personal intellectual responsibility for the definition of problems, the formulation of appropriate questions and convincing arguments, and the identification of sources.

A full description of the learning outcomes of this module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  The module is restricted to 4th-year Honours students.

Module Literature:  It is recommended that students purchase some of the following:

  • R. Nicholson, Scotland – the Later Middle Ages (1974, still in print).
  • M. Penman, The Bruce Dynasty in Scotland: David II, 1329-71 (2003).
  • S. Boardman, The Early Stewart Kings: Robert II and Robert III, 1371-1406 (1996).

The following background texts might also be read during the vacation:

  • M. Lynch, Scotland – A New History (1990).
  • G.W.S. Barrow, Robert the Bruce and the Community of the Realm of Scotland (1988).
  • R. Frame, The Political Development of the British Isles, 1100-1400 (1990).
  • M. Brown, The Black Douglases (1998).
  • A. MacDonald, Border Bloodshed: Scotland, England and France at War, 1369-1403 (2000).
  • N. Macdougall, An Antidote to the English: the Auld Alliance, 1295-1560 (2001).
  • C. Allmand, The Hundred Years War, c. 1300-c. 1450 (1989).
  • W.M. Ormrod, Political life in Medieval England, 1300-1450 (1995).

The following primary sources in print might also be read in the vacation:

  • W.F. Skene ed., John of Fordun’s Chronicle of the Scottish Nation (2 vols, 1993), vol. ii.
  • H. Maxwell trans., The Scalachronica (2000).
  • D.E.R. Watt et. al. eds., Walter Bower’s Scotichronicon (9 vols., 1987-99), vols. vii, viii.
  • A.A.M. Duncan ed., John Barbour’s ‘The Bruce’ (1997).

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  The module will be taught through weekly seminars, each lasting three hours.  Attendance is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment:  The grade is based on three essays of up to 4000 words (together 50%), two two-hour examinations (together 40%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9W7: Gladstone Studies

Module Content:  The module explores the personal development and political career of W.E.Gladstone (1809-1898).  It interweaves the study of a single individual with an examination of Victorian politics.  It evaluates the background of the young man, his early religious ideas, his Tory political activities, the emergence of his commitment to economic retrenchment, his attitude to foreign affairs, the nature of his engagement with parliamentary reform, his scholarly and cultural activities, his family and private life, his first administration as Prime Minister, his international and colonial policies, his mature religious thought and practice, his role as Liberal Party leader, his second administration, his involvement with the Irish question and his campaign for Home Rule.

Learning Outcomes:  The module aims to provide an understanding of the personal and political activities in their context of W. E. Gladstone (1809-98), four times Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, and to enable students to assume personal intellectual responsibility in the definition of problems, the formulation of arguments and the identification of sources.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  The module is restricted to 4th-year Honours students.

Module Literature:  Useful introductory works that are worth buying:

  • D. W. Bebbington, William Ewart Gladstone: faith and politics in Victorian Britain, Eerdmans (U.S.), 1993.
  • Roy Jenkins, Gladstone, Macmillan, 1995.
  • Philip Magnus, Gladstone:  a biography, John Murray, 1954 (out of print, but often available second-hand).
  • H. C. G. Matthew, Gladstone, 1809-1898, Clarendon Press, 1998.
  • John Morley, The Life of William Ewart Gladstone, Macmillan, 1903 (out of print, but often available second-hand).

Seminar Topics:  Introduction, Family Background and Education, Early Religion, Tory Politics, Retrenchment, Peace and War in Europe, Reform, Scholarship and Taste, Family and Private Life, First Administration, International and Colonial Policy, Religious Activities, Relations with the Liberal Party, Second Administration, Ireland, Home Rule Campaign, Assessment, Revision.

Module Structure:  There are no lectures.  The subject is studied through weekly seminars, each lasting three hours in both the autumn and the spring semester.  Course members each report on a weekly reading assignment, which is then discussed by the whole group.  At the end of each seminar an original document such as a speech or set of diary entries by Gladstone is carefully examined.  Attendance is compulsory and preparation essential.  All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them.

Assessment: The grade is based on three essays of up to 4000 words (together 50%), two two-hour examinations (together 40%) and oral work (10%).

HISU9Y7: The ‘Golden Age’ of the Scottish Parliament, 1660-1707

Module Content:  This module will be a political, institutional, governmental and policy study of the old Scottish Parliament in its last half century, but drawing on its development since the mid-sixteenth century.  The character and evolution of the Parliament will be placed in the context of the European experience in representative government in the early modern period. 

Learning Outcomes:  This module aims to provide students with an understanding in depth of the political and institutional developments in and around the Scottish Parliament in the period from the Restoration in 1660 to the parliamentary union with England in 1707 and its immediate aftermath.  The political philosophies and forces of reform and reaction in parliamentary affairs will be considered in the light of European developments in political thought and representative structure. Importantly, the module will enable students to assume personal intellectual responsibility in the definition of problems, the formulation of arguments and the identification of sources.

A full description of the learning outcomes of the module is provided in the module handout.

Pre-requisite:  The module is restricted to 4th-year Honours students.

Module Literature:   There is only one set textbook, which all students are expected to read:

  • Brown, K.M. Kingdom or Province?, Scotland and Regal Union, 1603-1715 (1992).

Other key texts in the library, but also recommended for purchase as well as reading include:

  • Brown, K. M. and Mann, A. J. (eds), The History of the Scottish Parliament, volume II: Parliament and Politics, 1567-1707 (Edinburgh, 2005).
  • Ferguson, W. Scotland's Relations with England.  A Survey to 1707 (Edinburgh, 1977).
  • Graves, M. A. R. The Parliaments of Early Modern Europe (Harlow, 2001).
  • MacIntosh, G. H. The Scottish Parliament under Charles II, 1660-1685 (Edinburgh, 2007).
  • Miller, J. (ed.), Absolutism in Seventeenth Century Europe (Basingstoke, 1990).
  • Smith, D.L. A History of the Modern British Isles, 1603-1707: The Double Crown (Oxford, 1998).

Module Structure:  There are no formal lectures. There will be eighteen weekly three‑hour seminars, which will involve a combination of formal student presentations, discussions, group exercises and the examination of primary source materials. Individual reading assignments (of primary or secondary materials) may be allocated for each seminar, though students will be expected to do independent background reading in addition to the specific allocationsAttendance at seminars is compulsory and at this level preparation is essential. All seminars are prescribed classes since students are assessed for their oral performance at them. 

Assessment: The grade is based on three essays of up to 4000 words (together 50%), two two-hour examinations (together 40%) and oral work (10%).

HISUHX7: Heritage Portfolio

Module content 

This is an independent study project focussed upon the research and development of a single large heritage profession output or a series of smaller outputs. The project is designed and undertaken by each student in conjunction with an academic supervisor (and perhaps a work-based co-supervisor/line manager within a heritage agency) over the course of the final year, semesters 7/8.

The BA Heritage & Tourism degree contains modules delivered across a range of Faculties and subject Divisions, however, the core teaching in Years 3 and 4, and the (primary) supervision of these individual portfolio projects, will be undertaken by History staff with heritage expertise. Additional supervisory contributions may come from particular disciplinary areas depending upon the nature of the project designed, e.g. Marketing, BES, Education. Moreover, where a student has developed their idea/outputs in conjunction with, or by commission from, an external heritage agency, additional supervision may be agreed with a line manager/mentor.

Learning Outcomes

Cognitive and transferrable skills

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:
• Demonstrate independent research skills
• Apply appropriate methodological, analytical and interpretive skills.
• Locate, analyse, synthesise and utilise complex bodies of information.
• Execute a project by organising time and resources effectively (and perhaps professional commission, project brief and budget).
• Successfully select and apply strategies, methodologies and design materials for public engagement, as appropriate to audience, media, genre, topic context etc.
• Demonstrate clarity and fluency in written expression, as well as effective use of visual/material resources.
• Utilise information and communication technologies to evidence and present work.

Subject-Specific Skills

On successful completion of the module students will be able to:
• Demonstrate a critical understanding of theories of heritage and public engagement.
• Display a detailed knowledge of relevant historical, art-historical and archaeological evidence and an understanding of current interpretations.
• Show a critical awareness of competing values and interests in heritage contexts.
• Demonstrate an appreciation of diverse audiences and stakeholders.

Module Structure

Students will spend a minimum of 5 hours over semesters 7 and 8 in 1:1 supervision meetings with a member of staff. Besides offering an opportunity to ask questions and clarify the direction of the research and project outputs, the meetings also serve to provide detailed comments on methodology and draft materials/media, to discuss particular sources from the literature, to advise on primary sources/data and archival resources, and to recommend relevant approaches and arguments that could further improve the quality of the work. In addition, further 1-to-1 assistance is available during regular feedback and guidance sessions.  Students undertaking a project in conjunction with an external heritage agency may take up to 50% of their independent study time working in situ on materials relevant to their portfolio: this time may include supervisory/commissioning input from a heritage agency line manager/mentor.

Towards the end of Semester 6, students will meet with the module co-ordinator, identify supervisors and draft an outline proposal. Early Autumn semester the portfolio proposal will be refines and developed. Students and supervisors will reach a general agreement on the overall size/length and nature of the individual components of the projected work together with a work schedule.  Draft heritage outputs must be submitted for review and feedback in mid-January and a draft of the written report should be submitted for comment by the start of March at the latest. 

Module Literature 

ARTUHR5 Interpretation and Exhibition Design and HISUHX7 module handout. Secondary reading relevant to (i) heritage topic chosen, and (ii) heritage professional practice chosen. 

Assessment 

The portfolio will take an electronic format submitted through SUCCEED. As well as a virtual digital mock-up of the heritage output(s), submitted in digital formats (60% of the overall grade), the completed project must also include a written report of c.4 - 5,000 words with references/ bibliography (30% of the overall grade).

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